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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Summers Corner, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Summers Corner, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Summers Corner, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Summers Corner, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Summers Corner, SC

Granite Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Summers Corner, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Silestone Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Summers Corner, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Summers Corner, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Summers Corner?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Summers Corner, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Summers Corner, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Summers Corner, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Summers Corner, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Summers Corner, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Summers Corner, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Summers Corner, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Summers Corner, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Summers Corner, SC

More than $12K raised for Apel family who lost Summers Corner home in fire

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Last week, a fire devastated the Apel family's home in the Summers Corner community.A...

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Last week, a fire devastated the Apel family's home in the Summers Corner community.

AGoFundMe was quickly started to support the Apel family and in just a few hours, the $5,000 goal had already been reached.

Yet people continued to donate and in 24 hours? The fund had reached about $11,000.

Read More: Flames envelop home in Summers Corner community of Dorchester County

As of Monday morning, donations were just over $12,530, with people still actively donating.

The GoFundMe states the money will help the family replace all that was lost in the house fire and support them until they reestablish a new home.

The photo used on the page shows two adults and four children.

Read More: Dozens give back in North Charleston on Easter Sunday

Flames could be seen shooting out of the kitchen of the home on Gnarly Oak lane at around 5 p.m. Friday.

The homeowner said the fire started on the porch of the home and quickly spread. Fire officials said the cause was an apparent electrical issue.

Everyone home at the time was able to escape without injury.

Questions arise over Summers Corner Improvement Plan

While council may have passed second reading for an improvement plan for as much as $100 million for a new mixed-use community inside the county, some of the governing body’s members still have lingering questions.Dorchester County Council approved second reading during its meeting March 20 in Summerville. First reading passed in January.The ordinance pertains to Summers Corner, a segment of the East Edisto property which spans Dorchester and Charleston counties. Summers Corner is specifically located between Beech Hill R...

While council may have passed second reading for an improvement plan for as much as $100 million for a new mixed-use community inside the county, some of the governing body’s members still have lingering questions.

Dorchester County Council approved second reading during its meeting March 20 in Summerville. First reading passed in January.

The ordinance pertains to Summers Corner, a segment of the East Edisto property which spans Dorchester and Charleston counties. Summers Corner is specifically located between Beech Hill Road and Summers Drive—also along U.S. 17-A—and encompasses nearly 7,000 acres in Dorchester County.

WestRock Land and Development plans—at no cost to the county—to fund the Summers Corner Improvement Plan through a property assessment on homes and commercial businesses.

But Councilman Larry Hargett told fellow committee members during a meeting Monday in Summerville that he isn’t on board with certain language included in the improvement plan’s language and will not vote in favor of the ordinance’s third reading unless changes to it are made.

“I’m in favor of what we’re trying to do,” Hargett said, “(but) I have great concern over some of the words.”

Hargett is particularly worried about the plan stating “county council requested” it.

“We did not request it; it was requested by WestRock,” he said—though the state requires the county to be a partner of the plan.

“We have to be a partner with them and be one of the ‘requesters,’ but we didn’t make this (initiative) happen.”

Because a public hearing for the ordinance isn’t required, Hargett said his concerns are vital and need immediate addressing.

“If council doesn’t bring up concerns then they won’t get brought up,” he said.

Finally Hargett wants future buyers in Summers Corner to know exactly what they’re getting into when they sign a contract—that the area’s a special tax district and has an additional HOA fee.

“I’m in favor of full disclosure,” he said.

Hargett said he plans to hand his questions over to County Attorney John Frampton to review and bring before council at the third and final reading.

And Hargett’s not alone in his concerns about the improvement plan.

Councilman Willie Davis said he hopes the assessment doesn’t later spread beyond Summers Corner or become competitive with adjacent neighborhoods.

“I’ve seen it happen too many times,” he said of other developments across the state. “(They) come in with good intentions and can’t pay for it. I think we’re smarter than that.”

According to Councilman David Chinnis—committee chairman—parts of the plan once concerned him, too—especially with regard to the county’s ultimate liability—but he said he’s now “satisfied” with the effort, even if it’s an unconventional development method.

“I’m satisfied at this point,” he said. “(The plan) is a way to ensure (development) gets done and residents maintain it in the future.”

According to the plan, an assessment of $30-$70 per unit per month—not a property tax but a rate—will be reflected on real property tax bills for property owners in the district. The assessments, which affect more than 9,000 residential and commercial properties, will fund $65 million of the $100 million in possible improvements and over the next 20 to 30 years, will annually increase by a rate of no more than 2 percent, depending on the speed of development.

The developer will determine which improvements, other than parks and trails, to build, but Council is in charge of approving any extra recreational facilities. Summers Corner residents will pay for their operation and maintenance, the plan states.

WestRock officials said since Summers Corner is located in an unincorporated part of the county where no city property tax exists, the assessment is a “smart, sustainable approach to fund parks, trails and roads."

Recommended improvements include public facilities: park, trails, connector roads and transportation improvements, water and sewer service, drainage and detention assets, and street improvements, among others.

Overall, a large portion of the East Edisto property will remain protected through deed restrictions, WestRock officials have said.

A date for the ordinance’s third and final reading has yet to be determined.

Neighbors create petition to keep a Summers Corner holiday tradition alive

SUMMERS CORNER, SC (WCIV) — Imagine a real Hallmark Movie.That's what a Summers Corner home looks like this holiday season. It's the type of decked-out holiday display to immediately catch the eyes of everyone driving by. It's hard to look left or right without seeing lights or decorations.The most unique part is that each item has a story. Some of them traveled by car for nearly 17 hours in order to make it to the Lowcountry, and others would only fit in a rental car. Even the Grinch himself, can't steal this Christmas s...

SUMMERS CORNER, SC (WCIV) — Imagine a real Hallmark Movie.

That's what a Summers Corner home looks like this holiday season. It's the type of decked-out holiday display to immediately catch the eyes of everyone driving by. It's hard to look left or right without seeing lights or decorations.

The most unique part is that each item has a story. Some of them traveled by car for nearly 17 hours in order to make it to the Lowcountry, and others would only fit in a rental car. Even the Grinch himself, can't steal this Christmas spirit.

"I think it’s wonderful what they are doing and if this was a decoration competition. I would say they win," neighbor Stella Taber said.

Reindeers, snowmen, and even Santa Claus are seasonal neighbors.

"Santa actually writes back to the kids, and the hot cocoa, and all of the treats they are so lovely to put together for everyone in the neighborhood," Neighbor Karina Aymerich said.

It's a holiday tradition for the O'Hea family. Brandy O'Hea said, "It started with one decoration and led to another."

Though, O'Hea said a new HOA wants to tone down the merry and bright.

"We got a letter that was dated 16th of November stating it was our second letter, we were in violation because we had decorations on the adjoining property. At that time of the letter, there was nothing out there," she said.

The letter asked the O'Hea family to have a "reasonable number of holiday and religious lights." It also said a fine of $25 dollars has been applied to their account. A third violation is 50 dollars.

"I don’t know what the definition of reasonable is," O'Hea said.

Some neighbors said it's a display of holiday magic.

"My son here Zachary has autism. He doesn't like gifts. A couple of years ago we were walking, and we walked past every single day by that pig that didn’t say Zach’s pig. We came back up a week later and it said Zach’s pig on it. I don’t like to admit this but I started tearing up because it hit me in my heart that these wonderful people are doing it not just for them, they are doing it for other people," neighbor Dino Pustalka said.

It's a gift that keeps on giving.

"This is the last thing that happens this year that we have hope. That we can feel a little bit or normality. We have had a horrible year. This is bringing everything that was normal back," Aymerich added.

Homeowners said they don't plan to take it down.

"I want the HOA to come here and see the joy that these kids have...running through taking pictures. Hugging the unicorns. And then see what it's like if you take it away from them," O'Hea said.

Kids in Summers Corner shared their personal display favorites with hopes of keeping joy alive this holiday season.

"I like the mermaids, and the angel. I think the mermaid is guidance and the angel is hope," Taber said.

There is a petition online that asks the HOA to change its mind about the Summers Corner holiday display.

ABC News 4 called the homeowners association and left a voicemail. An email was also sent to the office for a response to the neighborhood complaints. As of Wednesday evening, there has been no response. The story will be updated as soon as there is.

Fast-growing Summerville welcomes 1,000-student capacity East Edisto Middle to Oakbrook

SUMMERVILLE — When eighth grade history teacher Charity Carpenter first walked into her classroom in the new East Edisto Middle School on Aug. 8, she had to leave again and walk around the building to work off her excitement.It was the Monday before school was set to start, and the hallways still smelled of new paint. Other teachers wheeled carts and trolleys full of equipment and school supplies into classrooms. Friends greeted each other, asking about each other's summers or commenting on the new school.Around the corne...

SUMMERVILLE — When eighth grade history teacher Charity Carpenter first walked into her classroom in the new East Edisto Middle School on Aug. 8, she had to leave again and walk around the building to work off her excitement.

It was the Monday before school was set to start, and the hallways still smelled of new paint. Other teachers wheeled carts and trolleys full of equipment and school supplies into classrooms. Friends greeted each other, asking about each other's summers or commenting on the new school.

Around the corner from her classroom, Carpenter bumped into fellow teacher Amy Baldwin, who was directing students from her Gateway to Technology class how to unload her computers and robotics equipment. The students had been in Baldwin's class in previous years at Oakbrook Middle School and had volunteered to help her unpack her new classroom.

"How's your room looking?" Baldwin asked Carpenter.

"I just walked in and I just had to leave my stuff there and take a walk," Carpenter said. "I was just overwhelmed."

East Edisto is the biggest school she's ever been in, Carpenter told The Post and Courier. And the numbers back her up. The 120,000-square-foot school cost $31 million and took 16 months to complete. It's located off S.C. Highway 61 behind Beech Hill Elementary. At full capacity, it can hold 1,000 students.

When school officially begins on Aug. 15, it will welcome 850.

"We're pretty close to what we can hold," Principal Brion Rutherford said, adding that it's located in the Oakbrook area, one of the fastest-growing parts of Dorchester County.

"There are a number of new neighborhoods going in," he said. "We'll be at our capacity pretty quickly."

He and Shane Robbins, the new superintendent of Dorchester School District 2, said the new school is a factor of growth not only throughout the district but also in the Oakbrook area near the Ashley River.

News

A superintendent for 15 years at various districts, Robbins is no stranger to new school construction.

"There is so much excitement for students, families, teachers and staff members to move into a brand-new structure and make it their own and their home," Robbins said.

'Exploding' with growth

Nestled in the Oakbrook area, the school is surrounded by large and growing housing developments like Legend Oaks Plantations and Summers Corner, which are adding thousands of homes in the coming years.

Cheyenne and Brennan Ledyard live in Drayton Oaks, a small subdivision about a three-minute drive from East Edisto Middle. Like many residents in the area, they're still fairly new, having moved in when the neighborhood went up about two years ago.

They say the Oakbrook area, particularly the neighborhoods on either side of Highway 61, is "exploding."

"We're having tremendous growth on this side," Cheyenne said.

Last year, their son Hudson attended Gregg Middle School, on the other side of Dorchester Road and the Ashley River. Now he's starting seventh grade at East Edisto.

"He is very excited because this bus arrives about 20 minutes later than what he had to ride last year," Brennan said with a laugh.

She and Cheyenne said they feel the middle school is warranted, especially since there are already two elementary schools in the area, Beech Hill and Sand Hill. Their only concern is that traffic on Highway 61 might be worse in the mornings now.

Down Highway 61 in Summers Corner, Michelle Cheslek was riding her bike with her 6-year-old daughter Olivia on a recent afternoon. And even though Olivia still has several years before she goes to middle school, Cheslek said she's already relieved there's one that close.

"Otherwise I think she would have been going to Gregg, which is a little farther away," Cheslek said.

Like the Ledyards, Cheslek said the area is growing. Her family just closed on their house in May, and behind them, construction is underway on more houses.

Growth in the school district isn't anything new. DD2's student population has grown from around 16,000 students in the 2000-01 school year to more than 25,000 last year.

Managing growth

Despite population growth in Summerville, the district's student population saw a slight dip during the pandemic, according to DD2. During the 2019-20 school year, there were 26,194 students at the school. This past year, there were 25,404.

"If you look at our numbers from the end of last school year, they replicate our numbers from the 2014-15 school year," Robbins said, referencing a year with 25,175 students.

Robbins said that's a factor of the pandemic.

"That's a symptom of students that stayed in a virtual environment not associated with the school or possibly went the home-school route, and ... that wasn't a Dorchester 2 issue or trend," he said. "That's something we saw across the state and honestly across the country."

While those numbers have started to come back, Robbins said the bigger change is where the students are.

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"What I think you're seeing is a shift where geographically people are living in the county and where the population shifts have occurred," he said. "For us, there is going to be growth that we're going to rebound from post-COVID, so we need to have a long-term facilities study completed or updated."

Robbins said East Edisto is about the average size of a middle school, and he doesn't want it to get much larger than 1,000 students. He does believe the district will see more growth in the coming years and should have a plan to deal with that.

But he would rather utilize space in schools throughout the district before building any more schools.

"When you see numbers shift like that ... you look at the occupancy of each facility and, in lieu of building a new structure because one structure is at capacity, you look at, 'OK, how can I adjust the attendance lines to make sure all my structures are at capacity before I have to go to the taxpayers and ask for money to build for more structures?' "

In other words, the district will look at occupancy levels at each school and send students to schools with more room.

That can be "emotional" for the community, he said, which is why the district should have a formalized plan in place. That would be an involved process that looks at everything from county population projections to roads, bridges and "potential obstacles" along bus routes.

"There's a lot that goes into play when you look at making a decision on what's going to work best, but the overall goal is to try to fully maximize all of our facilities so that we don't have to consistently add on and build new structures because there's growth in one particular geographical area," Robbins said.

Earlier this year, district officials reported East Edisto was on track to be over-capacity within a few years of its opening. Robbins said that should only be a problem if the district doesn't put those plans in place.

"There is a lot of growth in that area," he said. "If we stayed status quo and we didn't look at those things, absolutely it would end up being overcrowded."

New opportunities for students

Baldwin is well aware of the growth. Not only will this be her 23rd year teaching in the district, but she attended DD2 schools from kindergarten to high school. That growth brings more opportunities for students, she said.

Take her subject, Gateway to Technology, which covers STEM subjects like robotics, design and engineering.

"That was such a small class back (when I first started teaching), and now it's bloomed and blossomed and we have all these engineering avenues," she said. "I have a sixth grader entering school, and the number of choices of classes, things like piano, that didn't exist when I was a student ... So just the opportunities our district has brought as it's grown has been really wonderful."

Rutherford said he had some input on the classrooms and other features while construction was underway, such as what kind of designs and furniture would best promote collaboration in STEM classrooms and where best to put electives so that they're located close to the sixth grade hallway.

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One important aspect of the design was safety features, he said. Those include cameras, alarm systems that will alert people when exterior doors are left open and a crosswalk across Highway 61 that will be manned during school drop-off and dismissal. There will also be a dedicated office for the school's social worker to help address students' mental health needs.

Rutherford echoed Baldwin's excitement for the array of opportunities — and praised Gateway to Technology in particular. He said Baldwin and the program she set up at Oakbrook have won multiple awards throughout the state. The same goes for chorus teacher Maurice Burgess, he said, who will run East Edisto's fine arts programs.

"I might be partial to this, but I think we have the best teachers in the school district, if not the Lowcountry," Rutherford said.

Reach Isabelle Altman at 843-666-7159.

DD2 projects 16K more students, several new schools over next 10 years

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - As schools across the Lowcountry recess for the summer, Dorchester School District Two is looking at how to plan out its anticipated future growth.Superintendent Dr. Shane Robbins said they are projecting an additional 16,000 new students to enroll in the district in the next 10 years. That’s a growth of anywhere between 1,000 to 1,500 students each year.“When Ashley Ridge High School opened, I think it opened with about 800 students,” Robbins said. “Today, they have abou...

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - As schools across the Lowcountry recess for the summer, Dorchester School District Two is looking at how to plan out its anticipated future growth.

Superintendent Dr. Shane Robbins said they are projecting an additional 16,000 new students to enroll in the district in the next 10 years. That’s a growth of anywhere between 1,000 to 1,500 students each year.

“When Ashley Ridge High School opened, I think it opened with about 800 students,” Robbins said. “Today, they have about 27, 28-hundred students, with that number growing every single day. That’s why we look at the rezoning options for us to make sure that we’re filling all of our buildings before we try to come to the community for tax dollars to build a new facility.”

He said most of the growth is centered around the Beech Hill and Summers Corner areas, with 17,000 homes set to be built across the entire county.

“We don’t know what the build out timeline is on those,” Robbins said. “That can be over the course of 10 years, but what we do know is these homes are being built in about 120 days, and they’re being occupied by families that have school-age children.”

The district’s latest projections show if no schools were built in that time, over 3,000 students would be zoned for Sand Hill Elementary School alone.

Robbins estimates the district may need as many as six new elementary schools, one or two new middle schools and a new high school to cover demand.

He also expressed interest in holding a long-range planning session regarding their future with the county this summer.

“We’d love to engage with them on that,” Dorchester County Director of Planning and Zoning Kiera Reinertsen said. “We’re actively working on our comprehensive plan right now, we’re seeking feedback from the community and school district as well on growth issues, concerns and needs.”

In the meantime, Robbins said they will have to bring in mobile classrooms and are looking at shifting attendance lines for some schools to address current overcrowding issues.

Robbins said the attendance lines won’t be changed for the upcoming school year, but they will have discussions about potential changes for the 2024-2025 school year.

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