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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Sullivan's Island, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC

Granite Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Silestone Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Sullivan's Island?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Sullivan's Island, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

A rare look inside an endangered South Carolina icon

Just before the Revolutionary War, the South’s first lighthouse was completed. Known as the “Charleston Light,” it stood 42 feet tall and burned whale oil to help guide vessels into the Charleston Harbor.On Aug. 7, 1789, Congress passed an act to establish lighthouses, beacons, buoys and piers that is now observed as Natio...

Just before the Revolutionary War, the South’s first lighthouse was completed. Known as the “Charleston Light,” it stood 42 feet tall and burned whale oil to help guide vessels into the Charleston Harbor.

On Aug. 7, 1789, Congress passed an act to establish lighthouses, beacons, buoys and piers that is now observed as National Lighthouse Day.

In 1838, the Charleston Light was reconstructed with a revolving light at 102 feet tall. It was destroyed during the Civil War. Finally, a third structure was built in 1876, which we know today as the Morris Island Lighthouse. It has 203 cast-iron steps to the top and is 161 feet tall.

The black and white brick lighthouse was originally 1,200 feet on shore with a lighthouse keeper’s house next to the tower. Over time, the paint faded and erosion of Morris Island slowly separated land between the island and the lighthouse. This is what you see today with the single structure just off of Morris Island and Folly Beach.

The lighthouse is in disrepair, but hauntingly beautiful.

As you walk inside, the first thing you see is the spiral cast-iron staircase, much of it rusted from sea salt, but the attention to detail in design still visible. The first few steps are too fragile to stand on. In the service room, there are paint markings where furniture may have been.

The lighthouse’s condition is why Save The Light Inc. was formed in 1999. The group works to preserve the structure and its history.

The earliest memory Denis Blyth had of this lighthouse was back in the mid- to late-1960s.

“I used to camp and fish on Morris Island with my father. We would pull up in a small boat and climb up across the rocks and go up into the lighthouse,” said Blyth, technical committee chairman of Save the Light. “The cast-iron staircase, even in its state today, takes my breath away.”

In later years, he took his own boat and began passing down the significance of the lighthouse to his children.

“I would take my children. My daughter was in a fifth grade art competition that won an honorable mention in the state and the theme was ‘my favorite places,’ ” he said. “She then went on to school to study engineering with her thesis on the Morris Island Lighthouse and now works in historic preservation.”

Save The Light members Robert New and local artist Jim Booth cosigned a note to buy the lighthouse for $75,000, paying it off within a few months by selling prints of Booth’s painting “First Light.” In 2000, the organization transferred the title to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, accepting a 99-year lease to help restore and preserve it through three phases.

Richard Beck, one of the founding members of Save the Light and former mayor of Folly Beach, said the first two phases were to build the cofferdam and focused on erosion control and foundation stabilization. They wanted to make sure the lighthouse wouldn’t fall over before starting to bring it back to life. This was estimated around $5 million for the first two phases, Beck said.

They are now in the third phase: repairing the interior walls, stairs, metal work, rails, the roof and replacing the glass in the lantern room.

The cracks alone — including one from the earthquake of 1886 — show the age of the lighthouse. Crack meters and sensors have been placed over them to be used for preservation for researchers like Anna Blyth, Denis Blyth’s daughter.

“South Carolina started out as a maritime community,” Beck said.

The Morris Island Lighthouse has long been part of Charleston’s community, and beyond. On June 13, 2003, the U.S. Postal Service honored the Morris Island Lighthouse with a stamp as part of its Southeastern Lighthouse Series.

In 2002, as part of Spoleto Festival USA, Korean artist Kimsooja used the Morris Island Lighthouse as the basis for her exhibit titled “A Lighthouse Woman.” The lighthouse was bathed in an ever-changing palette of color every evening for two weeks.

Dominion Energy South Carolina assisted Save The Light with the design and installation of a new lighting solution with renewable resources to create a self-contained micro-grid to illuminate the lighthouse.

Solar panels were added to power several new lights along with a new livestream camera that rotates, providing a bird’s-eye view of the harbor and surrounding areas.

“We appreciate the lighthouse’s valued place in Charleston’s maritime history, as well as the landmark’s iconic status across our broader coastal community,” said Paul Fischer, a Dominion spokesman.

The Morris Island Lighthouse will be lit up next on Oct. 1, for the anniversary of its first lighting.

South Carolina’s history of lighthouses spans hundreds of years. Several were built, burned down or destroyed and then rebuilt. Only a few remain along the Atlantic coast.

The Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse replaced Morris Island in 1962 and continues to shine in the early mornings. It was the last lighthouse the federal government built. A few others still remain, mostly as a symbol of South Carolina’s history, but are continued to be enjoyed by those traveling to see them through palmetto trees and white dunes.

Labor Day crowds return to normal for beach businesses

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.

Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.

“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” said Kathleen Arnold, fine art consultant at Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island. “The traffic is constant, back and forth. People walking to the restaurants, people heading to the beach.”

Arnold said in her experience, the tourism season on Sullivan’s Island typically lasts from May until Labor Day weekend every year. However, after seeing tourist travel ebb and flow “practically year-round” in recent years, she expects the season to last through October or November.

“People want to escape the hustle and bustle of life, so they come here,” Arnold said, attributing the steady growth of tourism to Charleston’s “small-town charm.”

Leaders at Folly Beach agree. Mayor Tim Goodwin said stores there are struggling to keep up with an increase of both foot traffic — and car traffic — from tourists and locals this summer.

“Sunday was a pile of people out here,” Goodwin said. “The first time this year we’ve seen traffic backed up as far as it was.”

Goodwin encouraged anyone heading to the water to use the free Beach Reach app. Created by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, the app provides live traffic cameras, maps and beach policies for three of Charleston’s most popular beaches.

The mayor said the biggest challenges facing store owners at Folly Beach are a lack of workers and employee burnout. As a result, some stores are struggling to keep their normal hours.

Click here to learn more about the town of Sullivan’s Island.

LOWVELO gearing up to be the best event ever; Glow Blue activities to include mechanical bull

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was...

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”

In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was forced to accept surgery as the only option to remove the mass,” Miller said.

This fall, his musical group, The Jake Bartley Band, will be headlining the LOWVELO finish-line block party. This annual fundraising event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, and 100% of the money raised by participants will fund lifesaving cancer research at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center in South Carolina. Participants can choose from four routes, stationary cycling, a virtual ride option or volunteering.

It’s a special time for survivors to gather; for Miller, this gives him a chance to support lifesaving cancer research following his own lifesaving treatment.

“Without organizations like MUSC stepping up through LOWVELO and connecting the funding dots, we would still be in the Stone Age of cancer research and treatment development,” said Miller. “LOWVELO is invaluable to those of us fighting.”

Hollings director Raymond N. DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., said this event brings together survivors, the community and Hollings researchers and clinicians in a powerful way. “Cancer touches everyone in some way. And this event is an opportunity for us to celebrate the advances we’re making and support research that will provide tomorrow’s cures as well,” said DuBois. “It’s so fun every year to see the excitement of the people who support us. It inspires us to work harder.”

An exciting addition to this year’s event is a Hollings rally line. Three of the routes will start at Brittlebank Park in Charleston and go past Hollings Cancer Center on Calhoun Street as participants then head to and across the Ravenel Bridge and through some of the most scenic areas of the Lowcountry. Another addition is a rolling lane closure throughout downtown and across the Ravenel Bridge, allowing riders more room and minimizing the impact on local neighborhoods.

“Similar to Charleston hospitality, there is really no route quite like the LOWVELO routes. They are so unique,” said Medalist Sports President Chris Aronhalt, who helps manage the event. “The scenic and breathtaking routes of LOWVELO take riders through the historic streets of downtown, across the famous Ravenel Bridge, through beautiful neighborhoods east of the Cooper River, into the Francis Marion National Forest and along stunning beach views on Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms. It’s a mix of all the best the Lowcountry has to offer.”

The LOWVELO fun starts this month with the annual Glow Blue Week, Sept. 19 to 23, held on the MUSC campus. Hollings Cancer Center will be lit up in blue all week long. Registration for the ride will be free, and the LOWVELO team will be handing out fun swag around campus. The week features a special glow-in-the-dark stationary cycling class on Wednesday, Sept. 21; participants can reserve their spots.

On Thursday, Sept. 22, LOWVELO team members will be on the MUSC Greenway with information, fun swag items and a chance to ride Bucky the mechanical bull from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. They also will be out there from 9 p.m to midnight.

On Friday, Sept. 23, the second LOWVELO as a Lifestyle Lunch and Learn will be held. Participants can join in person or online to hear from Sundar Balasubramanian, Ph.D., a world-renowned expert in yogic breathing and stress release. Also joining him will be a Wellness Center trainer who will teach mobility exercises.

On Friday, Nov. 4, the evening before the Nov. 5 LOWVELO event, there will be a packet pick-up party at Firefly Distillery. MUSC participants have two opportunities to get their packets at Hollings on Nov. 3: from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

No matter how people choose to participate, everyone involved is invited to join in the block party at the finish line, with live music, food and fun to celebrate cancer survivors and honor loved ones lost to the disease. This includes volunteers. It takes more than 300 volunteers to make the event a success, so people are needed for a variety of positions, from manning a rest stop to being an event photographer.

Miller said participants can expect a diverse and entertaining show. He and The Jake Bartley Band will be playing everything from country to funk and dance tunes and are excited to be part of the big LOWVELO block party. Miller knows how very fortunate he has been and offered up some advice for others fighting cancer.

“Surround yourself with others that have fought and won and don’t be afraid to reach out to a counselor or therapist for help also,” he said. “Keep your head up! Just like me, you didn’t ask to be in the cancer club, but you’re here now and part of a group of fighters that are all fiercely cheering for you to win.”

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

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