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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Sullivan's Island, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC

Granite Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Silestone Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Sullivan's Island?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Sullivan's Island, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Sullivan's Island, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Sullivan's Island, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Sullivan's Island, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

Contact Us

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Ian downgraded to post-tropical cyclone as it lashes Carolinas; Florida officials report more deaths

In an update with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday morning, Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Kevin Guthrie announced more fatalities from Hurricane Ian.He told reporters that there was one confirmed death reported in Polk County.In the hard-hit Charlotte County, 1...

In an update with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday morning, Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Kevin Guthrie announced more fatalities from Hurricane Ian.

He told reporters that there was one confirmed death reported in Polk County.

In the hard-hit Charlotte County, 12 reported fatalities were unconfirmed.

In Collier County, there were eight unconfirmed deaths.

Guthrie noted that the state was still processing a couple of other "situations," including one where human remains had been found.

He also warned about carbon monoxide issues, although noting he was not saying there had been carbon monoxide deaths.

The governor announced that more than $12 million in donations had been raised following Hurricane Ian's devastation.

"Pretty, uh, pretty incredible that that's happened," he remarked, adding that donations help FEMA to "be a little bit more nimble."

FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell said 13 counties in Florida have been designated for individual assistance as recovery and relief efforts are underway.

The number of customers reported without power on Friday morning dropped below the 2 million mark, although DeSantis noted that 99% of Hardy County was without power, as well as 85% of Charlotte and Lee Counties.

A water main break in Lee County, he said, left residents there without water.

The governor said that situation was a "top priority" and that the Army Corps of Engineers was working to assess that situation.

In addition, the DeSantis said that more than 10,000 residents – out of over 20,000 that have been contacted by the state – who had filled out a shelter in place survey on floridadisaster.org had responded as "safe."

The state expects more responses on Friday and there is now a standalone website to let family members know you're safe: missing.fl.gov.

As rescuers continue to work, DeSantis said that they had reached more than 3,000 homes in the most impacted areas, with over 1,000 rescue personnel located up and down the coastline.

The governor's office later confirmed to Fox News that there had been at least 700 rescues.

FDOT had cleared over 1,100 miles of roadway and the governor said that traffic was flowing out of the area and was "better than anticipated so soon."

800 bridges were inspected and reopened, but DeSantis noted that Sanibel Bridge would be a rebuild project.

The bridge had breaks in multiple parts.

Six health care facilities had been evacuated in southwest Florida after issues with water or power for an extended period of time.

DeSantis said that people have been working around the clock to be able to serve their constituents and communities.

"And, we appreciate the dedication. We appreciate the perseverance. We know that there's a lot of difficult days ahead, but they've really done a great job of standing up for the people of their community," he concluded.

How did SC get the Palmetto State nickname? It wasn’t just because there are lots of palmettos

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.Also called the cabbage palmetto, s...

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?

While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.

The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.

Also called the cabbage palmetto, sabal palm, inodes palmetto and the Carolina palmetto, the sabal palmetto was designated as the official state tree by Joint Resolution Number 63 all the way back on March 17, 1939.

This palmetto tree was symbolic toward the defeat of the British fleet at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This was due to the fact that the fort was built from palmetto logs, which absorbed the impact of the cannon balls and would not shatter.

Hence, South Carolina earned its nickname: the Palmetto State.

The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first decisive American victory over the British Royal Navy during the Revolutionary War and took place on June 28, 1776.

“The ferocity of the British naval bombardment had no great effect on the fort. Sabal palmetto trunks embedded in deep sand proved pliable and sturdy enough, absorbing iron balls like a sponge,” wrote the National Park Service of the battle.

At the time, Charleston residents were unaware if the fort had been victorious against the British or if it had been captured following the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

The fort’s commander, Colonel William Moultrie, had then sent a boat to inform the residents of the good news. Loud cheers were said to reverberate through the streets.

“The defense had been a major victory for the Americans in Charleston. General Lee wrote, ‘The behavior of the Garrison, both men and officers, with Colonel Moultrie at their head, I confess astonished me.’ Six days later the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia. Afterwards, the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the fort, Fort Moultrie, in honor of the commander of Fort Sullivan,” wrote the American Battlefield Trust.

As for the palmetto trees themselves, sabal palms are native to the southeastern parts of the country.

“The cabbage palmetto is found in the coastal plain region from North Carolina to Florida. The palm inhabits maritime forests, “islands” within salt and brackish marshes, and the edges of ponds. It is also a commonly planted tree in urban areas throughout South Carolina,” states the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The palmetto tree can grow to a height of 33 feet tall and its leaves can grow to about 3 feet across. They are formed with a spongier, scattered tissue and more malleable cells than most other trees, which allow them to bend with the wind during major storms such as hurricanes and tropical storms.

In addition to their many other attributes, these trees flower during the month of July and can be quite fragrant, attracting many types of pollinators.

As for size, according to Plant Real Florida, the University of Florida conducted several age and growth rates of sabal palms, the preliminary results indicated that, under average conditions in the wild, these plants can require 10 to 15 years of growth or more from seed to the first sign of a trunk at ground level. After this initial growth spurt, the trunks will grow about 6 inches per year. Meaning, a standing sabal palm with 20 feet of trunk is at least 50 years old.

The palmetto tree can be seen as a figure of significance in nearly every aspect of the state’s inception. It has been adopted as the state’s nickname, is included in the state seal, is on the state flag, is in the Pledge to the Flag of South Carolina, and can be seen in everyday life while carrying on day-to-day activities within the state.

This story was originally published September 14, 2022 5:00 AM.

How to Spend a Perfect Weekend in Charleston

Charleston, South Carolina has been a mainstay on lists of America’s top destinations for nearly a decade, with its dramatic oaks and pastel-hued homes. Founded in 1660, the historic coastal city was the site of the first shots of the Civil War and has hosted the likes of Blackbeard and Edgar Allan Poe. Today, there are hundreds of incredible restaurants, with a high volume of James Beard Award winners.Visitors love snapping photos of Rainbow Row, a colorful section of some of the city’s oldest homes, and the historic mark...

Charleston, South Carolina has been a mainstay on lists of America’s top destinations for nearly a decade, with its dramatic oaks and pastel-hued homes. Founded in 1660, the historic coastal city was the site of the first shots of the Civil War and has hosted the likes of Blackbeard and Edgar Allan Poe. Today, there are hundreds of incredible restaurants, with a high volume of James Beard Award winners.

Visitors love snapping photos of Rainbow Row, a colorful section of some of the city’s oldest homes, and the historic market. Looking ahead to the future, the new International African American Museum will open in January 2023, honoring the legacy of the enslaved people forced to work on Charleston’s plantations.

I spent my twenties living in one of the country’s most beautiful places and have spent much of my career singing its praises. And while downtown has its charms, there’s more to the city than just the peninsula. To help you along should you be planning a visit, here’s how to plan the perfect Charleston weekend.

How to Get There

Charleston International Airport has a number of nonstop routes from major cities like Chicago, Seattle, Miami, New York City and Washington, D.C. Amtrak and Greyhound also have stops in North Charleston, an easy taxi ride from downtown. It’s a five-hour drive from Atlanta, Georgia and 3.5 hours from Charlotte, North Carolina.

Where to Stay

Since travel and hospitality is the biggest industry in the city, visitors have a wealth of options when it comes to hotels. It really depends on your budget and which area you want to be based in.

Emeline is a stylish boutique hotel steps away from the city market and its many restaurants. That said, should you stay here, don’t miss Frannie & The Fox, the hotel’s restaurant with playful Italian fare and “cocktail windows” where you ring a bell and receive your drink from behind the wall. Their rooms also have record players and a selection of LPs to spin.

Across the bridge in the charming Old Village of Mount Pleasant, Post House is a seven-room boutique hotel and restaurant, the latter of which features incredible dishes like fish curry paired with locally-grown rice. Borrow one of their bikes to explore the neighborhood.

For unrivaled beach access, Wild Dunes on Isle of Palms is your best bet. The resort has two distinct hotels featuring large rooms with balconies, several restaurants, and activities like golf, tennis and a spa. Don’t miss The Nest, the rooftop bar, for tropical beverages and sunset views.

What to Do

Day 1: Downtown and North Charleston

On your way into the city, detour to the oft-overlooked area of North Charleston, which is known for being home to the airport, an outlet mall and performing arts venues. But go a bit further and you’ll find Park Circle, a charming planned neighborhood with excellent restaurants like EVO Pizzeria and Jackrabbit Filly. Firefly Distillery, creator of the original sweet tea vodka (among many other spirits), relocated to the area a few years ago and offers live music and food trucks.

The old Charleston Naval Base is also worth a drive through. Since it was decommissioned in 1996, the buildings have been used as locations for television shows and movies as well as a music festival site. When you’re ready for a drink, it’s an easy drive to the city’s brewery district in what’s called “The Neck,” the stretch between North Charleston and the Eastside. Don’t miss Edmund’s Oast, an excellent brewery and restaurant specializing in German-style beers.

Most visitors flock to downtown Charleston to roam the cobblestone streets and admire the iconic row houses. While you’re here, start at the Charleston Museum, the nation’s oldest, dating back to 1773, which covers the history of the city with artifacts from before America’s founding. There are about a dozen historic homes you can tour, depending on your interest level. But the best option is wandering around by foot.

The Gibbes Museum of Art has pieces like sweetgrass baskets and art from the Charleston Renaissance, a period of creativity that followed World War I. The City Market sells a range of souvenirs, but it’s the sweetgrass baskets woven by Gullah artisans that are the most notable.

Charleston is known for its award-winning restaurants, but if you want to get into the hottest tables in town, like Husk or The Ordinary, you’ll need to nab a reservation or go early. If you can’t get a table, look for alternatives away from downtown like Leon’s Oyster Shop or Rodney Scott’s BBQ.

Day 2: Mount Pleasant

Cross the iconic diamond-shaped Ravenel Bridge to the community of Mount Pleasant. The Old Village neighborhood is like a time capsule, appearing on screen in The Notebook and Netflix’s Outer Banks. Explore on foot or borrow a bike to navigate the streets.

Shem Creek is the seafood capital of the city, with shrimp boats lining the water to provide the freshest ingredients to restaurants. You can’t go wrong with just about any of them, but The Wreck of the Richard and Charlene is a local legend, and still family owned. Go early to enjoy the sunset views over a local beer and Lowcountry fare like fried oysters and deviled crab. Nico is another option, with French-inspired and wood-fired dishes, and plenty of rosé. If you visit during the day, kayak the creek with one of the local outfitters to spot dolphins and countless species of bird.

Further into Mount Pleasant is Town Center, a typical suburban outdoor mall. But there are some great restaurants to detour to on your way east. Malika Canteen is among them, the first Pakistani restaurant in South Carolina. Get the thali, which lets you try a number of small dishes.

After a bite to eat, stop by Palmetto Islands County Park, a nearly 1,000-acre space with boardwalks over the marsh and bicycle paths. Bring your binoculars to spot birds and a picnic for when you get peckish.

Day 3: The Beaches

You can’t come to Charleston without going to the beach! There are a number of options, but locals love laid-back Sullivan’s Island, a 15-minute drive from downtown. You’ll find that Middle Street is lined with bars and restaurants: Poe’s Tavern is named for Edgar Allan Poe, who was stationed at the nearby fort, and offers burgers and fish tacos; The Obstinate Daughter pulls from French, Spanish and Italian influences; and you can settle in for tropical drinks and wood-grilled shrimp at The Longboard.

Find a spot on the beach near the odd black-and-white Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse (Station 18 ½ is my favorite) or learn about the island’s role in the Civil War at Fort Moultrie. During World War I, the fort was used to watch out for submarines.

Since Sullivan’s Island doesn’t have hotels, plan on basing yourself on neighboring Isle of Palms, which has various stores if you need any essentials. Drive past the grand beachfront McMansions on your way to Wild Dunes Resort or start with a meal at one of the isle’s eateries.

Catch the sunset at The Boathouse at Breach Inlet, which focuses on local seafood. Islander 71 is found at the recently remodeled marina, where you can grab a bite before heading out on the water on a kayaking tour or hop across the creek to Goat Island. Finally, at the end of the night, catch live music at The Windjammer, a legendary local venue.

For more travel news, tips and inspo, sign up for InsideHook's weekly travel newsletter, The Journey.

Sullivan's Island residents launch campaign to get rid of fractional ownership homes

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.According to...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.

Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.

Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.

Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.

According to him, other residents on Sullivan's Island share his opinion and are not happy about it.

To try and stop it, he and his wife created a campaign to keep Sullivan's Island community oriented.

"We saw an advertisement where you could buy 1/8 of the house. After we dug a little deeper, it became apparent that this was, this is really a scheme to circumvent the rules that have been in place for over 20 years in a small town that limit short-term rentals; they prohibit them unless you were one of the properties prior 20 years ago," Emrich said.

Driving up and down streets on Sullivan's Island, you can't miss the signs that read "Stop timeshares on Sullivan's."

Emrich and his wife passed around the yard signs and have been attending town council meetings to try and stop Pacaso from selling homes on the barrier island.

"Our aim is to first of all raise awareness. We've obviously got over 200 signs out across the island. Any residents you speak to on Sullivan's Island adamantly oppose this game. Every member of the council is opposed to the scheme. And so, really, we're pushing the politicians to do something about it," Emrich said.

Emrich tells us the campaign's primary goal is to get town leaders to enforce the rules that are already on the books and push these types of companies and homes out.

He says communities across the country have successfully fought these types of companies.

"They're assuring us that they are on this. The government does not move this fast, and we would like them to, but they are giving us every assurance that they that they're going to do something about it," Emrich said.

Mayor Patrick O'Neil says residents feel short-term rentals destroy the sense of neighborhood.

He thinks no one wants to live next to a group of people on their first night of vacation.

“After a great deal of research and study, last week we issued a notice of zoning violation to the owners of the property in question here, and we are awaiting a response," Mayor O'Brien said.

Pacaso spokesperson Brian McGuigan stated: "Pacaso is not a timeshare. We help families co-own second homes, which is common practice and can help reduce competition for single-family homes on Sullivan's Island. Research shows that co-ownership contributes more to the local economy than the typical second home while redirecting second home buyers away from median-priced single-family homes in demand by locals and into high-end, luxury homes.”

Pacaso explains they aren’t a timeshare and retain no ownership interest in the home once sold, but they provide property management services.

Pacaso insists they will collaborate with Sullivan's Island leaders on any related public policy questions.

The company believes an ordinance addressing Pacaso’s model could broadly impact many houses.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

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