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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Kiawah Island, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Kiawah Island, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Kiawah Island, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Kiawah Island, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Kiawah Island, SC

Granite Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Kiawah Island, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Silestone Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Kiawah Island, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Kiawah Island?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Kiawah Island, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Kiawah Island, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Kiawah Island, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Kiawah Island, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Kiawah Island, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Kiawah Island, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Kiawah Island, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

MUSC Health breaks ground on Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to th...

The more than 20,000 square foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The Sea Islands community is expected to undergo significant population growth over the next few years, especially those residents 65 and older. The Sea Islands are also geographically isolated, situated more than 20 miles from the nearest hospital. The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.

“It can take up to 45 minutes to get to the nearest hospital from the Sea Islands. That’s too long for an emergency situation such as a stroke, where every minute counts. As the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, we are committed to delivering the best possible care, closest to home,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This new medical pavilion will provide rapid access to outstanding care for the entire Sea Islands community.”

As part of the MUSC Health system’s overarching strategy, the MUSC Health Charleston Division has worked to provide better community access and local care in the greater Tri-County region, as well as coastal communities to the north and south of Charleston. This enables better capacity at the flagship facilities, which offer specialized and complex care downtown while enhancing overall accessibility and continuity of care for patients and families, especially in underserved communities. Since 2019, four new multispecialty ambulatory care platforms have opened in West Ashley, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

In addition to 24/7 emergency care, the facility will offer two trauma rooms, a rooftop helicopter pad, and a medical office building that will provide primary and specialty care, including imaging and lab services, cardiology and physical therapy. A telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to some of the nation’s top providers at MUSC Health in downtown Charleston. The Town of Kiawah Island donated $1 million to create a healing, restful green space and garden adjacent to the new facility.

“Accessibility to the wonderful health system and hospitals we have here has been a concern, so it was exciting to hear about this project,” said Town of Kiawah Mayor John Labriola. “My hat’s off to the MUSC Board of Trustees and the institution’s leadership, because getting a certificate of need is not easy… personally, I look forward to the ribbon cutting and seeing our garden that will be named for the Town of Kiawah.”

The project was made possible in part by Kiawah Partners, which was acquired by South Street Partners in 2013, who donated 6 acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority (MUSC Health), valued at $4.85 million.

"This project was initiated to meet the huge need for medical services on Kiawah Island, Seabrook, and Johns Island. With no convenient emergency healthcare options currently available, we have been working for seven-plus years to figure out a way to bring accessible healthcare to the Sea Islands,” said Chris Randolph, South Street Partners. “Thanks to MUSC, we will soon have a world-class medical facility that provides so much more than what we had originally envisioned. We couldn’t be more pleased to have been able to donate the land for this project and feel very grateful to partner with such an excellent health care system.”

Of the estimated $30 million needed to fund the project, MUSC is committed to raising $17 million in private support. To date, it has received more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts, with many coming from local residents.

“Private support is critical to the long-term success of the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion because of the many financial challenges that come with operating a medical facility in this community,” said Kate Azizi, vice president for Institutional Advancement. “One challenge is the low population density of the Sea Islands. While this is an aging population that needs timely access to medical care – there aren’t enough people living in these communities full time to sustain our operations. Philanthropic support helps fill those gaps, allowing us to deliver the best care possible where and when it’s needed.”

Donors Chris and DeeDee Gibson are giving $2 million to the project. In recognition of their generosity, the physical therapy space will be named in their honor. “My family has been coming to Kiawah for close to 40 years,” Chris Gibson said. “When my wife DeeDee and I built a home here, she had one request: that there was a hospital nearby in case of an emergency. All these years later, we are excited to contribute to the new MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion and to help make these vital medical services available to our neighbors on Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands.”

“The construction of a full-fledged medical facility with emergency services is a dream come true for all Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook Islands,” said local resident Pam Harrington, who donated $2 million and will name the emergency department after the Harrington family. “As our population continues to grow and more folks are retiring to our area, the demand for medical services grows with it! Being a Kiawah/Cassique resident for many years, the addition of a medical pavilion fills a real need that has existed over several decades. Prior to my 40-plus years in real estate on the islands I was a practicing ICU nurse. This medical center is near and dear to my heart! As a thank you and show of appreciation to all who have been so supportive of my success, here, on the Sea Islands, it seems befitting to take this opportunity to give back in a meaningful way.”

Construction is expected to conclude in late 2023.

Quote bank:

Seabrook Mayor John Gregg – “It is indeed my pleasure to welcome MUSC to Seabrook Island, as our local community will be well served by the capabilities of this facility and the practitioners who will staff it. We look forward to having better availability of care, ranging from emergency room treatment, to advanced diagnostics for the ailments, bumps, pains, scrapes, stings, and strains that come with having an active and diverse population.”

MUSC Board of Trustees Vice Chairman Charles Schulze – “On behalf of the board, I want to acknowledge, commend, and deeply, deeply thank you for your dedication hard work and the public private collaboration that is taking place to get us to where we are today. As an air force veteran of the Vietnam war, I know the importance and necessity of teamwork. When you have a complex mission ahead of you in those situations, your unity as a team is your biggest strength… And it didn't matter where you live, where you were from or what your background was in our military. You learned that persistence, perseverance, collaboration, and expertise are critical to the success of a mission. And it's been no different in this case. When the board began to discuss the feasibility of this project, we knew it wasn't going to happen without teamwork and vision. Not only from everybody at MUSC, but also from the community here in the sea islands.”

MUSC Health System CEO and Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Dr. Pat Cawley – “What makes this project challenging is that it doesn’t fit into normal health constructs. We spent a lot of time with the community, trying to gauge what was needed and it was clear that there was tremendous community support for this project and it was the engagement with the concept of neighbors caring for neighbors and the work of the community to reach out to state officials and regulators that helped make this project a reality. MUSC Health is proud to be a part of this community and its health care provider of choice, and we are humbled by the level of support we are receiving to bring this shared vision to reality.”

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, MUSC is the state’s only comprehensive academic health system, with a unique mission to preserve and optimize human life in South Carolina through education, research and patient care. Each year, MUSC educates more than 3,000 students in six colleges – Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy – and trains more than 850 residents and fellows in its health system. MUSC brought in more than $327.6 million in research funds in fiscal year 2021, leading the state overall in research funding. MUSC also leads the state in federal and National Institutes of Health funding, with more than $220 million. For information on academic programs, visit web.musc.edu

As the health care system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest quality and safest patient care while educating and training generations of outstanding health care providers and leaders to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Patient care is provided at 14 hospitals with approximately 2,500 beds and five additional hospital locations in development; more than 350 telehealth sites, with connectivity to patients’ homes; and nearly 750 care locations situated in all regions of South Carolina. In 2022, for the eighth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets totaling $5.1 billion. The nearly 25,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers, scientists, students, affiliates and care team members who deliver and support groundbreaking education, research, and patient care.

In a Shifting Economy, a Developer Keeps Asking What Buyers Want

While navigating the industry’s ups and downs, Chris Randolph of South Street Partners says his firm has learned that “you can’t rinse and repeat.”This article is part of our latest special report on International Golf Homes.When it comes to second homes and golf communities, South Street Partners has more than a dozen years of experience under its belt, riding the industry through economic ups and downs a...

While navigating the industry’s ups and downs, Chris Randolph of South Street Partners says his firm has learned that “you can’t rinse and repeat.”

This article is part of our latest special report on International Golf Homes.

When it comes to second homes and golf communities, South Street Partners has more than a dozen years of experience under its belt, riding the industry through economic ups and downs and the increased popularity of drive-to developments in the wake of Covid-19.

South Street, a private equity development firm based in Charlotte, N.C., and Charleston, S.C., has scored major acquisitions of the Kiawah Island Club in South Carolina and its two golf courses; Palmetto Bluff in Bluffton, S.C.; and the Cliffs development, which is set in the Blue Ridge Mountains and has seven separate communities in South Carolina and North Carolina.

With $1 billion in assets, the company’s strategy has been to primarily focus on the southeastern United States, which has experienced sustained population growth partly because of the migration of families and older adults to warmer climates.

Prices start around $2 million in their suite of developments, and Chris Randolph, a partner, says South Street is seeing no slowdown. In the coming year, South Street is building new homes at Kiawah and the Cliffs developments in South Carolina, particularly around Lake Keowee, and in Palmetto Bluff.

Golf remains, depending on where you live, a popular — and lucrative — attraction, so South Street is planning two new courses at Palmetto Bluff in the coming years: a nine-hole short course by King-Collins (architects of the Sweetens Cove course outside Chattanooga, Tenn., which has attracted investors like Peyton Manning); and another course at a private club.

At Kiawah, where Covid increased golf demand and drove up home prices, Beau Welling, Tiger Woods’ design partner, will work on a new course with a residential component. South Street plans to put a considerable amount of land into a conservation easement.

Mr. Randolph spoke about his firm’s investment plans and residential golf developments. The following conversation has been condensed and edited.

South Street just raised its first discretionary fund of $225 million. What does the fund allow you to do for the future, and how will it affect your existing portfolio of properties?

This is the first discretionary fund in South Street’s history and allows us to be more acquisitive of new properties while continuing to work with our legacy investment partners in the private equity and hedge fund space. At the same time, it will also allow us to do deals entirely on our own, to the extent we would like to do that.

As for existing properties, we will use the fund to make improvements at Palmetto Bluff, where we’re building a short course and a regulation 18-hole course, and Kiawah, where we will build a new 18-hole course, as well as other amenities and development activities.

How will you handle the golf real estate at both Kiawah and Palmetto Bluff? Has anything changed about how South Street views residential golf communities?

We may have a bit of a novel approach in that we’re not necessarily layering in real estate directly on the golf course. We want to create the best golf experience possible. From our perspective, that means what I would call a core golf course with little to no real estate impacting the golf experience.

Our theory is that if you create an incredible world-class golf experience, just the proximity of homes to that course will yield higher prices than a traditional fairway-lined real estate golf course development.

When you talk about giving the architects the best land, how much of that is member/customer-driven, and how much of that might be attributed to the average golfer’s growing understanding of what a good golf experience entails?

I think it’s both. We think the golf consumer has gotten far more sophisticated in terms of what they expect. To deliver on that, we need to find the best land for the best golf.

I used the term novel earlier, and I think it is probably still considered a little bit of a novel approach in our industry to not try and really integrate a ton of real estate on the golf frontage.

Another factor that’s driving this for us is that, at Kiawah, we actually see premiums for lots and homes on the parks that we’ve developed versus golf courses. The theory there is that people, especially young families, will pay more for frontage on a park they can access 24 hours a day versus a golf course where you really are only getting out there before and after the golfers play.

South Street has really made a push into offering turnkey homes at its properties. This seems to follow an industry trend. Is that consumer-driven, or simply the best way to maximize profit?

It’s very much consumer-driven and probably the biggest change to our industry, meaning high-end second-home communities. Fifteen years ago, the product of choice was the estate lots where you buy a lot, find an architect, find a builder, find a landscape architect and manage that all yourself.

Through the downturn of 2008 to 2010, people started taking a different approach, where they weren’t necessarily interested in taking on a project of that type. They still wanted a second home, but they were willing to trade some of the customization for a turnkey product that checked probably 90 percent of their boxes.

If you look at our home building activity, we are now the largest home builder at Kiawah and the largest home builder at the Cliffs. We will soon be the largest at Palmetto Bluff, because we believe fully in that strategy of delivering a finished product and doing so with scale and efficiency.

On Lake Keowee [at the Cliffs], we just set a record with a purchase price of $6.3 million. We designed it, built it and did the interiors, all the way down to the forks and knives in the drawers.

To that point, what are other major developments you’ve noticed in the last 10 years, and where do you foresee things going in the next five years?

As we enter into whatever this recessionary — whether it’s deep, shallow, long or short — environment, we’re going to be very conscious of what that means for our buyers.

The good news is we’ve got a very long-term outlook at all of our projects of 10-plus years, if not more. So, we don’t concern ourselves too much with slowdowns in the market in terms of our business plan, but we also want to be conscious of overdeveloping during a time when sales might not be there.

So, we’ll continue to build our amenities. We’ll continue to build the clustered neighborhoods around those amenities. Maybe we’ll scale back a little bit on some of the larger spec homes, but I don’t think it changes our business plan much at all, if any.

One thing we know is that you can’t rinse and repeat. That might have worked in another time, in different cycles. We’ve got to create unique products and, more than anything, we have to deliver the best product possible from both a club and resort experience.

At the end of the day, that’s what people are buying: the private club experience we can offer. The home is important, but you’re buying a lifestyle. Our buyers have worked a long time to have the ability to buy into these communities. The service, amenities and experience we offer need to be just world class.

'We just needed it so badly': Celebrating groundbreaking for Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

DeeDee and Chris Gibson have spent time on Kiawah Island, about 25 miles south of Charleston, for about four decades. “DeeDee and I built a house here, and one request she had was that we had a hospital close by for emergency needs,” he said.But there wasn’t one. Now, thanks to the generosity of the Gibsons and other donors, that’s about to change. The mayors of Kiawah and Seabrook islands joined leaders from MUSC on Sept. 8 to break ground for the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.DeeDee Gibson, ...

DeeDee and Chris Gibson have spent time on Kiawah Island, about 25 miles south of Charleston, for about four decades. “DeeDee and I built a house here, and one request she had was that we had a hospital close by for emergency needs,” he said.

But there wasn’t one. Now, thanks to the generosity of the Gibsons and other donors, that’s about to change. The mayors of Kiawah and Seabrook islands joined leaders from MUSC on Sept. 8 to break ground for the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.

DeeDee Gibson, who with her husband contributed $2 million to the project, was on hand to see it. “I’m just glad to be a part of it. We just needed it so badly.”

The pavilion, on Seabrook Island Road near the Bohicket Marina, will serve Kiawah, Johns and Seabrook islands and the surrounding area. Pat Cawley, M.D., CEO of the MUSC Health system, said the goal is to bring health care to the people who need it. “We would establish this by providing a 24/7 emergency room, more primary care, more specialty care and all of this would be backed up by a world-class academic health system.”

Here’s a little more detail about the features Cawley mentioned. The free-standing Emergency Department will have a helipad for people who need to be flown to MUSC Health’s downtown Charleston hospital, four exam rooms, two trauma rooms and fast-track triage, along with X-ray, CT scan and lab services.

Other services in the medical pavilion will include:

David Cole, M.D., president of the Medical University of South Carolina, said the pavilion symbolizes the future health of the community and thanked everyone who helped make it possible.

“Your dedication to the health and wellness of this community will have an impact for generations to come. This marks a major milestone for this community and the many who will come after you and also the many who will serve here on a daily basis, certainly a beginning of a journey.”

That journey is possible due in part to the real estate investment firm South Street Partners. It donated the land for the medical pavilion and has strong ties to the area, including a luxury senior living site under development near the medical pavilion.

But the journey to this point hasn’t always been easy. Charles Schulze, chairman of the MUSC Board of Trustees, noted the time and effort that have gone into it.

“As an Air Force veteran of the Vietnam war, I know the importance and necessity of teamwork. When you have a complex mission ahead of you, in those situations, your unity as a team is your biggest strength. And it didn’t matter where you live, where you were from or what your background was in our military. You learned that persistence, perseverance, collaboration and expertise are critical to the success of a mission,” he said.

“And it’s been no different in this case. When the board began to discuss the feasibility of this project, we knew it wasn’t going to happen without teamwork and vision. Not only from everybody at MUSC, but also from the community here in the Sea Islands.”

Leaders of those islands were happy to help realize that vision. They thanked MUSC Health for bringing badly needed care to the area.

“We look forward to having better availability of care, ranging from emergency room treatment to advanced diagnostics for the ailments, bumps, pains, scrapes, stings and strains that come with having an active and diverse population,” said Mayor John Gregg of Seabrook Island.

Kiawah Mayor John Labriola said he also looked forward to seeing the healing, restful green space and garden adjacent to the new facility that his town donated $1 million for.

MUSC is still raising money to build the medical pavilion. Of the estimated $30 million needed, MUSC is committed to raising $17 million in private support. So far, it has more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts, with many coming from local residents such as the Gibsons. They said it’s rewarding to be able to help.

“We’re really excited to be a part and contribute to MUSC and really look forward to having the medical needs for everybody on Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands,” Chris Gibson said.

Georgia can break your spirit. Just look at South Carolina’s empty stands.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A study of the football human condition took place Saturday in the giant football lab of Williams-Brice Stadium, revealing how some people go ahead and exit home stadiums when it’s 24-0 at halftime, while others choose 31-0 at 13:21 of the third quarter, while still others reckon it’s enough at 38-0 six minutes later, while still others wait for an interception at 38-0, while still others wait for 45-0. That last group may or may not include the guy 20 rows up behind the end zone who remained lonely and sup...

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A study of the football human condition took place Saturday in the giant football lab of Williams-Brice Stadium, revealing how some people go ahead and exit home stadiums when it’s 24-0 at halftime, while others choose 31-0 at 13:21 of the third quarter, while still others reckon it’s enough at 38-0 six minutes later, while still others wait for an interception at 38-0, while still others wait for 45-0. That last group may or may not include the guy 20 rows up behind the end zone who remained lonely and supine on the metal bleacher, his knees bent upward and a small towel mercifully covering his face in the heat.

Were they connoisseurs, they would have stayed to witness some of the smartest, most beautiful college football played anyplace in any year: that of the moment of No. 1 Georgia, whose apparent 48-0 win became officially 48-7 with 53 seconds left on a South Carolina touchdown the conference should overrule on review — not because it wasn’t legit but because it didn’t fit.

Eight months after the proud program got its first national title in 41 years, and five months after it sent a 15-man drove toward the NFL on draft weekend, the Bulldogs stand 3-0 and look really, really, really-really-really good. They’ve outscored Oregon, Samford and South Carolina 130-10. In an alleged road SEC game, the customary rooster call from the Gamecocks’ stadium public address on third down began to sound like a cry for help on the verge of strangulation.

Roger Goodell called names of five Georgia defenders in the first round in April, and Coach Kirby Smart frets a bit about the green defensive line that needs time and practice reps, and Smart guarantees there won’t be 15 draftees this time, but the defense still reserves the right to keep your offense from running free or to chase you down and foil your giddiness if you do.

And the offense. Gracious. Smart called it “explosive,” a word not overused in his seven-season tenure. They’ve got the ball going all over the lot and they’ve got coordinator Todd Monken calling reverses and flea flickers, which must delight fans who want every other play to be a reverse or a flea flicker.

They’ve got a sophomore tight end from Napa who not only got to grow up in Napa but also runs around looking not completely unlike Hercules. Said this Brock Bowers, “It’s always hard matching up with some tight ends,” as tight ends can be both “big” (6-foot-4, 230 pounds, like Bowers) and “fast” (4.5 seconds in the 40-yard dash, like Bowers). Said wide receiver Ladd McConkey, “Just whenever he gets the ball in his hands, people are bouncing off of him.”

Said Smart: “I don’t even know his numbers. I know he looked fast running down that field” — not to mention “the amount of attention that he draws.”

Here were those numbers: one rush for five yards and a touchdown on a reverse; five catches for 121 yards and two touchdowns, one in a wrestling-match catch in the corner of the end zone, one on a 78-yard score on a short toss to an empty middle. For that one, Georgia’s selfless attention to detail shone in Darnell Washington’s downfield block, which Smart extolled and said, “Holes are created through displacement, not just blocking.”

They’ve got a national champion starting quarterback, Stetson Bennett, once so-so like all of us yet getting better and better and better. He’s flipping a pass over a guessing defender to McConkey to roam in a space as wide as the beach at Kiawah Island for a 28-yard gain on the opening march. He’s dodging two defenders and running for chunks. He’s vomiting from over-hydration while continuing a drive, even insisting upon holding for the extra point, a full-time job for Georgia these days. Said Smart, “It’s hard to defend a quarterback that can check things, make throws, has weapons, and then he can run on top of it.”

Then they’re all going around talking about practice — practice this and practice that. “Every single week, that’s our goal: to make practice harder than the game,” said defensive back Kelee Ringo, eternally famous for the 79-yard interception return that clinched the championship in January. He pegged Georgia’s wildly detailed practices as where they’re “put in every situation” and “always get somebody’s best,” where the somebodys are mighty. He spoke of the evident horror of feeling “complacent,” and Smart spoke of “the standard created last year and the legacy,” which “lingers around our building — not the championship but the way they practiced.”

So the home fans fled early, a scene Ringo said would count among Georgia’s goals because of what it meant, rather like Smart saying, “I thought we challenged our guys to come on the road in the SEC and play really physical, attack from the get-go, and not be treading water.” He called the trip a chance to flex Georgia’s composure muscle, such as after the successful fake punt South Carolina Coach Shane Beamer ordered in the first quarter, something you might even call “Beamerball.”

“Gave up a fake punt,” Smart said, “[and] nobody panics; everybody’s happy they get to go out and play some more.” Soon came a fourth and nine when an open Jalen Brooks caught a short pass and Ringo chased him down from behind.

Then the halftime exit came in thin but steady streams of Gamecocks garnet, out through the nearby parking lot past the tailgate porta-potties and over toward the RVs, out through the crosswalks and down the street near the BP and the sprawling building marked “Budweiser of Columbia,” out the other way toward Bojangles and Waffle House — out, out, out. The home majority of the 78,212 proved more football fans than football aesthetes, and by the third quarter, the six sections of bleachers behind the end zone, filled at the outset, had rough fan counts of 16, 40, 76, about 96, 46 and 17, while the sections around the bend from there boasted three, 17, 17, 24 and 51.

7 Things to Do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier ...

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier island is a true escape. Here, nature reigns supreme: ten miles of beaches roll out along the Atlantic; cicadas form their own sort of soundtrack; and lights-out is often determined by the sea turtles' nesting season. Even so, there's plenty to do for travelers who like their time in nature punctuated with good food, luxurious creature comforts, and a frozen drink in hand. Here are seven things to do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Stay Like a Local

For access to all of Kiawah's amenities, from bike rentals to pools, you'll have to stay on the island. For an experience that's luxurious but unpretentious, book a room at The Sanctuary, an oceanfront hotel known for its five-star service and elevated onsite dining. For families who want a little room to spread out (or a kitchen), villa and home rentals are a smart choice; reserve through the resort directly, or book through a site like VRBO or Airbnb.

Spend a Day on the Sand

On the west end of the island, Beachwalker Park is Kiawah's only public beach access feels like a hidden gem, thanks to its wide, unspoiled expanses of sand. It offers the best of both worlds too: in addition to the ocean frontage, you can also score views of the Kiawah River here.

Hit the Links

Five state-of-the-art golf courses are open to the public. For avid fans of the sport, the Ocean Course alone makes Kiawah worth the trip. Host to two PGA Championships, the 18-hole course is not for the faint of heart. Raised above the dunes to capitalize on the expansive shore views, golfers are also subjected to ocean breezes (which don't exactly make for an easy or predictable trip around the green). Try Cougar Point for marsh views and a slightly less technical experience.

Go for a Cruise

One of the best ways to explore the island is to leave the car in park and take a beach cruiser for a spin (you can reserve them through the resort or bring your own). Between 30 miles of paved trails and 10 miles of hard-packed beach, there's no shortage of routes to explore. Ask for directions to the Marsh View Tower, an observation deck primed for birdwatching and soaking in the marsh and river scenery.

Visit Heron Park Nature Center

The naturalists here will school you in many of the species who call the island home, from bobcats and white-tailed deer to loggerhead sea turtles and American alligators. Sign up for a guided tour, like "Back Island Birding", "Marsh Kayaking," or "Ocean Seining and Beach Combing," or ask for their recommendations for the best nature-spotting places in the area.

Explore Freshfields Village

Built around a lush lawn, Freshfields Village has plenty of restaurants and shops to explore, plus a boutique stay, the Andell Inn. Pick up a beach read at Indigo Books; snag treats for your four-legged friends at Dolitte's; and gear up for island adventures SeaCoast Sports and Outfitters. Start the morning with coffee and a breakfast sandwich from Java Java; settle in for grilled cheese and a milkshake at retro Vincent's Drugstore & Soda Fountain; or cap off the day with house-made frosé from newly opened The Co-Op. Check their calendar for seasonal events, like summertime's "Music on the Green" concert series and farmer's market.

Venture to Bohicket Marina & Market

Make the short drive to neighboring Seabrook Island for a taste of the area's salty maritime culture. Snag a umbrella-shaded table on the upper deck at Salty Dog Café for fresh catch, a cold beer, and riverfront views of the boats coming and going from the marina.

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