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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Johns Island, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Johns Island, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Johns Island, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Johns Island, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Johns Island, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Johns Island, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Johns Island, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Johns Island, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Johns Island, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Johns Island, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Johns Island, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Johns Island, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Johns Island, SC

Granite Countertops in Johns Island, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Johns Island, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Johns Island, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Johns Island, SC

Silestone Countertops in Johns Island, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Johns Island, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Johns Island, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Johns Island, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Johns Island?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Johns Island, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Johns Island, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Johns Island, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Johns Island, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Johns Island, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Johns Island, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Johns Island, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Johns Island, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

Contact Us

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Proposed redistricting maps could unite Johns Island under one district

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The redistricting process for the city of Charleston is well underway, and Tuesday night the City Council and the public will review potential renderings for the new districts.Some Johns Islanders are advocating for Johns Island to be all one district, and for the first time in Charleston’s history, there is a potential it could be.Peter Rubino, a re...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The redistricting process for the city of Charleston is well underway, and Tuesday night the City Council and the public will review potential renderings for the new districts.

Some Johns Islanders are advocating for Johns Island to be all one district, and for the first time in Charleston’s history, there is a potential it could be.

Peter Rubino, a resident of Johns Island, says the original draft from the city split Johns Island into three districts.

Through email campaigns and spreading awareness, he and other advocates were able to get it down to two districts, and after tonight, hopefully, one.

“If you don’t speak up, then you’re not going to get what you need,” Rubino said.

He said having all of Johns Island in one district would give Johns Islanders a real say in their future, and true influence in city decisions.

He said he wants the person who represents Johns Island to live on Johns Island, with the hope that the shared experiences of the island will lead to more impactful decision making.

“We want someone who’s going to live here, and understands the issues, what the desires are of the people who live here and have to put up with the traffic and the growth and all of those things. Because if you don’t live here, you don’t see all those things that are going on,” Rubino said.

Tuesday night, he, along with other advocates, plan to attend the City Council Meeting to continue the fight for one district.

The city of Charleston’s Chief Innovation Officer Tracy Mckee said two scenarios will be presented tonight.

She said the first one prioritizes minimizing change, but splits Johns Island into two districts.

“In that scenario, Johns Island has two representatives, but each of those representatives also represent parts of West Ashley as well as James Island,” McKee said.

She said the second, which keeps Johns Island under one district, prioritizes compactness and communities of interest.

In that scenario, Johns Island has only one representative.

Regardless, Mckee says the City is doing its best to listen to the public and accommodate their desires.

“We have made a really good effort to get public opinion this time and bake that opinion into our plans as much as possible,” Mckee said.

As of now, Johns Island is a part of a larger district in West Ashley. Up until this redistricting, it did not have the population to be its own district.

Tuesday’s meeting is at 5 p.m. at the Charleston City Hall at 80 Broad Street. Rubino encourages those passionate about redistricting on Johns Island to sign up to speak.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Lowcountry high school football schedule - Week 4

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Week four of the high school football season kicks off on Friday night. Check back here for scores and highlights and watch Friday Night Lights on Live 5 News Friday at 11:15 p.m.9/16Cane Bay 31, James Island 28 - Live 5 Game of the Week: Cobras 2-1 hand the Trojans 4-1 their first loss of the yearFt. Dorchester 48, Berkeley 6 - Patriots get back to .500 2-2, Stags fall to 1-4West Ashley 7, Wando 0 - Wildcats start off strong 5-0, Warriors fall to 1-3...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Week four of the high school football season kicks off on Friday night. Check back here for scores and highlights and watch Friday Night Lights on Live 5 News Friday at 11:15 p.m.

9/16

Cane Bay 31, James Island 28 - Live 5 Game of the Week: Cobras 2-1 hand the Trojans 4-1 their first loss of the year

Ft. Dorchester 48, Berkeley 6 - Patriots get back to .500 2-2, Stags fall to 1-4

West Ashley 7, Wando 0 - Wildcats start off strong 5-0, Warriors fall to 1-3

Blythewood 42, Goose Creek 28 - Gators lose fourth straight 0-4

Sumter 16, Summerville 0 - Green Wave takes first loss of the season 3-1

Ashley Ridge 26, St. James 10 - Swamp Foxes pick up the win 3-1

Carolina Forest 17, Stratford 14 - Knights lose the close contest 0-3

Beckham 48, Stall 0 - Bengals improve to 4-1, Warriors lose in the shutout 0-4

Colleton County 19, North Charleston 12 - Cougars get first win of the season 1-3, Cougars drop to 2-3

Woodland 23, Bishop England 13 - Wolverines stay undefeated 4-0, Battling Bishops move to 1-4

Aynor 52, Philip Simmons 31 - Iron Horses fall to 3-2

Hanahan 30, Timberland 24 - Hawks still undefeated 3-0, Wolves cannot get in the win column 0-5

Scott’s Branch 20, St. John’s 16 - Islanders lose a close one 0-5

Cross 14, Lack Marion 9 - Trojans jump to 4-1

Baptist Hill 36, Allendale-Fairfax 28 - Bobcats win third straight

Academic Magnet 26, Palmetto Christian 10 - Raptors win fourth straight, Eagles move to 0-4

Whale Branch 53, Burke 12 - Bulldogs lose big 0-4

Porter-Gaud 24, Ben Lippen 22 - Cyclones win in the nail-bitter 3-2

First Baptist 28, Hilton Head Prep 14 - Hurricanes jump to even on the year 2-2

Pinewood Prep 40, John Paul II 26 - Panthers move to 2-3

Hilton Head Christian 35, Northwood Academy 0 - Chargers lose their fifth game in a row 0-5

Thomas Heyward 50, Dorchester Academy 22 - Raiders take first loss on the season 4-1

Colleton Prep 53, Andrew Jackson 22 - War Hawks show out in big win 4-0

Lee Academy 49, St. John’s Christian 36 - Cavaliers drop to 2-3

9/17

Military Magnet (1-3) at Bethune-Bowman

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Bridging the gap: Hilton Head, Beaufort County Council could reach agreement on U.S. 278 soon

Months of gridlock between the Town of Hilton Head and Beaufort County may come to an end soon to pave a clear path for the U.S. 278 Corridor project.Since spring of this year, Hilton Head and the county have been locked in what state Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, compared to a ping-pong match over their vision for changes to U.S. 278 approaching the island. Disagreement on whether the island should be connected to the mainland by one six-lane bridge, as the county envisions, or a pair of three-lane bridges preferred by thousands of isl...

Months of gridlock between the Town of Hilton Head and Beaufort County may come to an end soon to pave a clear path for the U.S. 278 Corridor project.

Since spring of this year, Hilton Head and the county have been locked in what state Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, compared to a ping-pong match over their vision for changes to U.S. 278 approaching the island. Disagreement on whether the island should be connected to the mainland by one six-lane bridge, as the county envisions, or a pair of three-lane bridges preferred by thousands of island residents, has been the most prominent of several contentious points.

The Town Council debated the county’s amendments to Hilton Head’s proposed “memo of understanding” Tuesday night, a high-profile agenda item that brought dozens of residents to the council chambers.

Last month, a county committee voted to “narrow the scope” of the project in an attempt to get it moving. On Sept. 12, it agreed to send one last “memorandum of understanding” to the town to reach a middle ground on the project. The holdup came after the Town of Hilton Head recommended that another traffic study be conducted.

After over two hours of discussion and public comments on the county’s changes — which some members of the public said were an attempt to “bully” and “vassalize” the Town of Hilton Head — Mayor John McCann said the council would send a new version of the MOU to the county for consideration at the Beaufort County Council’s meeting next Monday.

“I will then call a special meeting either next week or the following week to vote on (the MOU), up or down, when we get the county’s comments back,” McCann said.

The memo presented in the council meeting’s agenda packet was thoroughly struck through with red marks, indicating where the county had suggested changes of language or removal of specific parts of the memo. Ward 4 Councilwoman Tamara Becker and some residents were frustrated to find the memo included in the packet was also different to the version presented at the meeting.

In the county’s revisions to the memo, the two bodies would “agree that one bridge will be designed and constructed.” It also proposed the county and town create a committee to select a firm for an independent review of the project’s impact.

The proposed members would be the county’s transportation program manager, its assistant administrator for infrastructure, and the county administrator alongside the Hilton Head town manager and assistant town manager for community development.

The uneven balance of representatives on the committee concerned some Hilton Head residents, who saw the proposed apportionment as a way for the county to exert its influence.

“As a final insult, the County Council (in the MOU) even attempts to wrest control of the independent consultant selection process from Hilton Head town government,” Gray Smith, a resident of Hilton Head, said at the meeting. “(County Council Chairman Joe Passiment) and the County Council are once again attempting to bully Town Council into acquiescing to and approving their totally one-sided county MOU version.”

Another resident, Richard Busy, said he was one of the nearly 10,000 who signed a petition urging Town Council to reject the current MOU, despite the county’s claim that it is willing to move forward with its plan with or without Hilton Head’s cooperation. The move could also split the project into smaller pieces, leaving the town with more responsibility to shoulder alone.

“There truly should be an independent review done. Too much is at stake,” Busy said. “The threats from the County Council should be ignored. We should not surrender to the county.”

Tuesday night’s public criticism was a carry over from social media outcry following County Councilman Stu Rodman’s vote in favor of the one-bridge county resolution. Rodman represents Hilton Head’s District 11 on the County Council.

Despite the apparent distance between the two parties, Davis said the town and county are closer to an agreement than it seems.

Near the end of the lengthy debate, Davis said the Town Council had identified a set of concerns he felt confident he could convince County Council to address on Monday.

One of those was securing equal representation for the town and county on the committee to select an independent review firm. At the meeting, Rodman said the county would be willing to adjust the committee’s makeup to address the issue. Becker petitioned for the revised committee to include citizen representatives as well as county and town officials.

Another attempt to reach an agreement, Davis said, was an additional paragraph to affirm the Town of Hilton Head approving the MOU would not be construed as municipal approval for the project without the independent end-to-end study being completed.

“Moreover, (the town) is expressly withholding municipal consent until ... it’s had a chance to get the data from this independent contractor, to assess that data and make an informed decision,” Davis said.

Including the full scope of work for the project and potential review, Davis said, is another potential addition to a finalized MOU.

Rodman said he and the County Council were “in agreement” with much of what was discussed Tuesday evening, and that he supported the second independent review moving ahead. His primary concern, though, is the potential rising costs if the project is bogged down longer.

There has been a discrepancy in how much a role inflation is projected to play in the project costs. Davis said the estimated costs have risen $8.5 million in the last five months, while Rodman previously predicted costs could rise $50 million with a six- to nine-month delay.

What is important for the project’s funding, Davis said, is to ensure the project isn’t bifurcated or delayed long enough to lose the $120 million that the South Carolina Transportation Infrastructure Bank has set aside for construction.

“I don’t mean to say that if we continue ping-ponging back and forth that money doesn’t become at risk, because it will,” Davis said. “What I’m telling you is, based on what’s happened so far, it’s not yet at risk.”

Town officials acknowledged the need for compromise on their end as well. Ward 6 Councilman Glenn Stanford said if the county is willing to address the issues raised by Hilton Head in the MOU, he’d be willing to accept a single-bridge construction plan.

“I say that hesitantly because I don’t want one bridge, I want two bridges,” Stanford said. “But I understand that the bridges are not within the town limits of Hilton Head Island, so we don’t have much jurisdiction over that. I’m willing to accept that as a concept.”

Ward 3 Councilman David Ames agreed that at this point in the process, the town should “do its darndest” to mitigate the environmental and traffic impacts of a one-bridge construction.

With both sides prepared to make concessions, future language on the MOU should be adjusted to affirm the town and county as equal partners in the project, Ward 1 Councilman Alex Brown said.

“When you start to talk about the benefits of the project, we can talk about that both ways — off island and on-island,” Brown said. “But when you talk about ... the negative impacts, that’s a one-way street. There’s no way that we can say we’re not equal partners when (the town) is absorbing all of the impacts.”

Becker said while she understands the frustration some harbor regarding how long the project has been discussed without significant progress, it’s essential that all parties involved come to the table and make sure construction is done right.

“Keep in mind that what’s good for Hilton Head is good for the county, and is good for the state,” Becker said. “So we stick together, and we make sure that this bridge, whatever it is, is the best it can be for our residents.”

This story was originally published September 21, 2022 9:37 AM.

Father Marcel Algernon new priest in charge at St. John’s Episcopal Church

Father Marcel Algernon grew up in Guyana, South America, where he was ordained in the Anglican church. Having grown up, as what he describes as a staunch Anglican, led to his desire to become a priest.“It’s not just because I wanted to. We have to test that calling,” Algernon said.As a teenager, Algernon found himself at many retreats doing exactly that, which led him to seminary at the age of 19. By age 23 he had been ordained as a deacon and by 24, he was an ordained priest.Algernon said he believes o...

Father Marcel Algernon grew up in Guyana, South America, where he was ordained in the Anglican church. Having grown up, as what he describes as a staunch Anglican, led to his desire to become a priest.

“It’s not just because I wanted to. We have to test that calling,” Algernon said.

As a teenager, Algernon found himself at many retreats doing exactly that, which led him to seminary at the age of 19. By age 23 he had been ordained as a deacon and by 24, he was an ordained priest.

Algernon said he believes one of the keys to a life in faith is having a wide community.

“You have that light from each person, to mold and to shape and to influence, whether you are in seminary or not,” Algernon said.

Algernon’s experience on Pine Island, before being called here as the priest in charge, has been limited, as he said he’s visited a few times, but never for an extended period. The island, he said, is beautiful, laid-back and peaceful, calling it a gem. He explained his role as priest in charge as a mutual agreement between himself and the congregation, with the input and blessing of the church diocese and bishop.

“They let the church know, we have these candidates, and they’ll interview you, although it’s not an extensive interview and if there is a mutual agreement, they’ll let the bishop know and he makes the appointment,” Algernon said.

A call to military ministry transitioned Algernon to active duty chaplaincy in the U.S. Army and later, the U.S. Air Force. During his time in military service, he said he was privileged to assist in a number of Episcopal Churches in the local dioceses where he was stationed, including the Diocese of Colorado, South Carolina and Springfield, Illinois. Algernon said he also had the unique opportunity to pastor the St. Alban’s Episcopal congregation at Kapaun Chapel, Vogelweh Air Base, Germany.

His departure from active duty in 2004 brought him to the Diocese of Southwest Florida.

“In January 2005 I began my tenure as vicar of St. Anselm’s, Lehigh Acres. My ministry there lasted 17 years, and now God has called me to shepherd His people at St. John’s,” Algernon said.

Another facet of Algernon’s professional life, he said, is the privilege of working in education. Since 2004 he has been working as an elementary school counselor in Lee County schools, serving as a bi-vocational priest, for which he said he is truly grateful and humbled.

“The full range of pastoral responsibilities is covered. The arrangement is more flexible. I’m there every Sunday, I take care of all the pastoral visitations for the sick, I still do all the pastoral offices like baptism, weddings and funerals. Where it’s a little more flexible is my having a permanent presence, rather than keeping office hours. If someone needs to see me, we can meet when I’m done at school or speak on the phone or even meet on the weekend,” Algernon said.

In this season, Algernon is very prioritized regarding his objectives as he said his role in this time and place is to be a steady presence, feeding the people, and nourishing them spiritually.

“That is my ministry — to care for them, to love them, to be in fellowship with them — that’s what a priest does. A priest is a shepherd who cares for the sheep — the people to whom he has been sent. St. John’s Episcopal Church is here. We’re open, we’re welcoming, we’re warm. If anyone is looking for a church home, or even if they’re just looking to visit, we would like to extend an invitation,” Algernon said.

St. John’s Episcopal Church is located at 7771 Stringfellow Road, St James City, FL 33956. For more about the church, call 239-283-1820.

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VFW Post 4353 to host all-you-can-eat sushi event Saturday

Father Marcel Algernon new priest in charge at St. John’s Episcopal Church

MSNBC host Mehdi Hasan flips out on President Biden for saying 'pandemic is over'

Mehdi Hasan, host of MSNBC's "The Mehdi Hasan Show," reacted to a clip of President Biden saying during an interview with CBS News' Scott Pelley that the COVID-19 "pandemic is over.""One of the (many) reasons they’re not wearing masks is because people like Biden keep (falsely) telling them the pandemic is over," Hasan tweeted in response to the "60...

Mehdi Hasan, host of MSNBC's "The Mehdi Hasan Show," reacted to a clip of President Biden saying during an interview with CBS News' Scott Pelley that the COVID-19 "pandemic is over."

"One of the (many) reasons they’re not wearing masks is because people like Biden keep (falsely) telling them the pandemic is over," Hasan tweeted in response to the "60 Minutes" interview with Biden.

Pelley asked the president if the COVID-19 pandemic was over while walking through the Detroit Auto show.

"The pandemic is over. We still have a problem with COVID. We're still doing a lot of work on it," Biden said. "If you notice, no one's wearing a mask, everybody seems to be in pretty good shape and so I think it's changing, and this is a perfect example of it."

Pelley also asked the president if he would be running for re-election in 2024.

"Look, if I were to say to you, ‘I’m running again,’ all of a sudden, a whole range of things come into play that I have – requirements I have to change and move and do," Biden said, referring to election laws. "It’s much too early to make that kind of decision. I’m a great respecter of fate. And so, what I’m doing is, I’m doing my job. I’m gonna do that job. And within the timeframe that makes sense after this next election cycle here, going into next year, make a judgment on what to do."

CHUCK TODD ON NEW NBC POLL: BIDEN ‘GETTING A LIFT FROM SIMPLY DONALD TRUMP’S PRESENCE’

The CBS reporter continued to press the president on whether he would run again in 2024 and Biden said that he intends to run again, "but it's just an intention."

"But is it a firm decision that I run again? That remains to be seen," he said.

Pelley also asked the president if the U.S. would defend Taiwan.

"Yes, if in fact there was an unprecedented attack," Biden responded. "Taiwan makes their own judgments about their independence. We are not moving – we're not encouraging their being independent. We're not – that – that's their decision."

Biden's interview with CBS marked his first on air, sit-down interview with an American journalist in seven months.

The president sat down with NBC's Lester Holt in February, but the NBC appearance was Biden's first major media interview in four months.

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