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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Isle of Palms, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Isle Of Palms, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Isle Of Palms, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Isle Of Palms, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Isle Of Palms, SC

Granite Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Silestone Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Isle of Palms, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Isle of Palms?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Isle of Palms, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Isle Of Palms, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Isle Of Palms, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Isle Of Palms, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Isle of Palms, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Isle of Palms, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

New waterfront park coming to Isle of Palms this year

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Isle of Palms City Council in 2020 voted to make additions to the marina area of the island and that project is officially slated to be completed this year.The project included the addition of a public dock, a boardwalk and a waterfront park and greenspace. The boardwalk and public dock have been completed, and, as of Jan. 11, the construction contract for the waterfront park and greenspace was officially confirmed.The waterfront park will cover the 300 by 25 foot wide area along the marina faci...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Isle of Palms City Council in 2020 voted to make additions to the marina area of the island and that project is officially slated to be completed this year.

The project included the addition of a public dock, a boardwalk and a waterfront park and greenspace. The boardwalk and public dock have been completed, and, as of Jan. 11, the construction contract for the waterfront park and greenspace was officially confirmed.

The waterfront park will cover the 300 by 25 foot wide area along the marina facing the Intracoastal Waterway. There will be a 6-foot wide concrete walkway. The park will include a large lawn area with lush planting.

They plan to include a series of benches along the waterfront walkway so residents can enjoy views of the water and boating activities. There are plans for a circular seat wall near the public dock that would create an entrance to the dock area.

They plan to include a kayak storage area and a kayak launch area. There will be golf cart parking available as well as bicycle parking areas.

All of these plans did require collaboration and participation from the marina manager and restaurant tenants. Scott Toole, the general manager of the Outpost, a nearby restaurant, says he is very excited for this addition to the area.

“I think that it’s an added benefit to the island, to the residents, everybody, to have a space and to use the dock. Kayak launching is a big thing that I think people will take advantage of.” he says. “It’s really going to help make this area kind of a place of interest for people, sort of a destination so to speak, for people to be able to get some food, get some drink, watch the water and use the dock that’s right there.”

Toole says they very recently renovated the Outpost and he’s excited to see this new project bring more people to the area. He says he feels like this area of Isle of Palms is often overlooked as it is a little ways away from the main beach.

“We’ve kind of joked that it’s a small corner of the island and so, anything that’s bringing people down this direction is good for everybody. We’re excited to see this project take place,” he says.

The project is currently slated to be completed by May of this year. To provide City Council your input on this project you can click here.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Isle of Palms noise ordinance up for discussion after questions from businesses

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - Big changes could be coming to the noise ordinance on Isle of Palms as city leaders hope to make the rules more clear.The city’s noise ordinance currently doesn’t list specific limits. A proposal would establish set decibel levels based on the time and day of the week as well as the area:Isle of Palms business owners got the chance to see the numbers and ask questions on Friday.“We want them to understand that they have a voice, we want to hear from them,” Police Chief...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - Big changes could be coming to the noise ordinance on Isle of Palms as city leaders hope to make the rules more clear.

The city’s noise ordinance currently doesn’t list specific limits. A proposal would establish set decibel levels based on the time and day of the week as well as the area:

Isle of Palms business owners got the chance to see the numbers and ask questions on Friday.

“We want them to understand that they have a voice, we want to hear from them,” Police Chief Kevin Cornett said. “Anything that is going to impact businesses we want them to be able to come to us and say what they think about it.”

One area resident, who only identified himself as Paul, says the noise ordinance needs to have a balance.

“Obviously, late at night you don’t want people making a lot of noise walking up and down the streets while residents are trying to go to bed, but at the same time this is a vacation spot, so you have to have a little bit on leeway for people to enjoy themselves but also be respectful,” he said.

Cornett says they’re working to find a solution that will work for businesses and residents and increase livability for everyone.

Cornette says noise is a hot topic on the island and he values feedback on this from both residents and business owners.

“Everybody is very much invested in this conversation,” Cornett said. “The city council is taking it very seriously and they are going around and talking to people to get their input. So, I think they are doing a great job on making sure voices are heard so that when we get the final project it’s fair and something that will work for everybody.”

Officers use a calibrated decibel reader when called out to a noise complaint.

“That’s how we determine if it’s a violation and then we would take other factors into account like background noise to keep the realistic approach to is as well,” Cornett said.

The public safety committee has to create a final draft before it will head to the city council for two separate readings.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Whose beach is it? Isle of Palms homeowner, state at odds over unauthorized 'sea wall'

ISLE OF PALMS — Record tides from an unexpected nor'easter in December ripped away several feet of sand on this barrier island, exposing an unauthorized, clandestine wall in front of a beachfront home near Breach Inlet.The wall's unveiling also spawned a power struggle between the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Ocean Boulevard homeowner, with the two at odds over property rights and protecting the diminishing shoreline....

ISLE OF PALMS — Record tides from an unexpected nor'easter in December ripped away several feet of sand on this barrier island, exposing an unauthorized, clandestine wall in front of a beachfront home near Breach Inlet.

The wall's unveiling also spawned a power struggle between the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Ocean Boulevard homeowner, with the two at odds over property rights and protecting the diminishing shoreline.

SC Climate and Environment News

This is all playing out on a sandy beach where waves are clawing closer to multi-million dollar homes amid heavy erosion caused by storms and high tides.

The home at the center of the dispute belongs to Rom Reddy, owner of the multimedia local news outlet MyLo News. After taking a beating from Hurricane Idalia last year, Reddy said he installed the wall as a erosion control barrier and covered it with 30 feet of sand.

The December nor'easter washed away the sand, uncovering the bulwark.

While performing post-storm damage assessments, DHEC became aware of the structure.

Some call it a sea wall, which the state defines as a retaining wall designed to withstand wave forces. Reddy maintains his wall isn't a sea wall, as it was never meant to be exposed to the ocean. It was meant to be buried beneath the sand to protect his home's foundation and yard, he said.

"This keeps my yard stable and keeps it from moving around, which is what a retaining wall does. If we have a catastrophic event, it gives my property some protection, although a very nominal level, because it's not meant to be ocean facing," Reddy said.

Reddy said the nor'easter left the wall tilting and unstable, prompting him to have it rebuilt. In response, DHEC sent a cease-and-desist letter in January to halt the construction.

Cease he did not. Construction on the wall continues to move full steam ahead and shows no sign of slowing down.

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Reddy said it is his right as a property owner to protect his home. The area landward of the setback line is his to do with as he pleases, he said, citing South Carolina's Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands Act.

Not so, according to DHEC's division of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.

The sand in front of Reddy's property is considered a critical area, the agency said, and any alteration of a critical area requires permits from OCRM, even critical areas that are landward of the jurisdictional setback.

DHEC spokesperson Laura Renwick said the agency regularly issues permits for work in these areas, though it is unlikely Reddy's wall would have been approved.

"Since erosion control structures and devices such as the one identified at this property have been banned per state law since 1988, this structure would not have been permitted," Renwick said.

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Isle of Palms officials said they are aware of the structure, which violates a city ordinance prohibiting hard erosion control measures like sea walls, bulkheads and revetments. But in the case of Reddy's unauthorized structure, the city said its hands are tied. Jurisdiction of that area, and much of the island's critical areas, fall under DHEC, said Mayor Phillip Pounds.

"In this particular case, the OCRM has claimed jurisdiction, so that takes the city out of the mix, and it is up to them to enforce the state-level rules. We are relying on the state to enforce their rules that prevent structures like this being built per their cease-and-desist orders," Pounds said.

Judges in two cases in recent years have sided with homeowners who built walls or placed sandbags along eroding sections of the South Carolina coast.

While Reddy is facing pushback from DHEC, some of his neighbors are behind him. Paul Jorgensen, who owns the property adjacent to Reddy, said he doesn't love what is being erected next door, but he understands his neighbor's mindset. Working with the city and the state to get approval for protective measures has left him feeling frustrated.

"The city and the state have been utterly horrible at handling the situation. Not only have they been utterly horrible at managing, they won't even let us help ourselves," Jorgensen said.

Jorgensen said the preventative measures the city does take on aren't enough.

Ongoing restoration and protection efforts on the island include continuing sand scraping and sandbag placements on the island that began under an emergency order following Hurricane Idalia in September. City Council gave the efforts a boost in October, allotting $1.25 million to continue sand scraping along the beaches to rebuild the dunes. Council also budgeted $250,000 for installing sandbags on properties within 20 feet of erosion areas.

"The city and the state are not doing nearly enough, and, in fact, are preventing homeowners from protecting our own property," Jorgensen said.

South Carolina hasn't allowed structures like Reddy is building since enacting the Beachfront Management Act in 1988, citing a "false sense of security" the measures give to beachfront property owners while simultaneously aiding in further erosion.

Structures like sea walls block the ability of a wave to break naturally, pushing its force onto adjacent properties. The energy bounces back off of the wall, pulling the sand and eroding the beach on the seaward side. Emily Cedzo, director of conservation programs and policy for the Coastal Conservation League, said softer measures for preventing erosion, like sand fencing and larger restoration projects, are ideal for protecting beaches.

"Those are really the ideal ways to manage a beach responsibly so that it can provide good protection for private properties, but also public access and wildlife habitat," Cedzo said.

With multiple cease-and-desist directives, DHEC could begin to dole out fines or penalties.

"When DHEC identifies violations of applicable state laws or regulations, the agency has the authority to initiate an enforcement process that may result in the issuing of a civil penalty to the responsible party, among other actions," Renwick said.

Some think it's time for DHEC to take action.

"I think DHEC is going to have to move forward with enforcement. I don't know what their process or timeline looks like, but I think it's clear that they've already tried to communicate with the property owner," Cedzo said. "I know that several residents on the Isle of Palms are really concerned about it and continue sending reports."

Reddy said the cease-and-desist directives from DHEC won't deter him.

"They have to go in front of a judge and prove to the judge that we're, in fact, breaking the law. And we're ready for that," Reddy said.

Reach Anna Sharpe at 843-806-6790.

Charleston Beach Foundation asks Isle of Palms, SCDOT to revoke parking plan

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston Beach Foundation is asking the city of Isle of Palms and South Carolina Department of Transportation to revoke current parking plans along beach access points.The group disclosed its concerns in a letter on November 27, claiming the “general public is being denied their constitutional guaranty of equality and privilege.”Isle of Palms City Council put the regulations into place in 2015 with the goal of making the beaches functional and safe.The 2015 parking plan, ame...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston Beach Foundation is asking the city of Isle of Palms and South Carolina Department of Transportation to revoke current parking plans along beach access points.

The group disclosed its concerns in a letter on November 27, claiming the “general public is being denied their constitutional guaranty of equality and privilege.”

Isle of Palms City Council put the regulations into place in 2015 with the goal of making the beaches functional and safe.

The 2015 parking plan, amended in 2017, cost $250,000 in taxpayer dollars and is modeled off similar plans in both Charleston and Columbia.

The city claims the plan was made to manage “unbridled growth” in the region, both nearby in Charleston and further out in the Lowcountry.

Activists say it does not match up with the increase in commercial use of the island or overall population growth.

“Revoke the 2015 parking plan on Isle of Palms, return all residential-only parking spaces on both Sullivans Island and Isle of Palms back to the general public,” Michael Barnett says.

Barnett says the plan eliminated a number of free spots and instead gave them to short-term rentals in nearby neighborhoods.

The Charleston Beach Foundation also claims the area has since become a hot spot for commercial use, with the city voting in a referendum on Nov. 7 to not limit short-term rental licenses.

“They were really the first to do it. They started to do it piece by piece, which really got my attention because I was a surfer,” Barnett says. “Businesses are operating in these areas. Not basically, they are. They’re not residential neighborhoods anymore.”

City officials weighed in on the matter.

“We are very much a residential community. Certainly, in season, we have a lot more visitors than we do residents. But we provide eight times the among of parking required by the state,” Isle of Palms Mayor Phillip Pounds says.

Pounds says the island offers an abundance of free parking with the current plan, scattered around 56 beach access points.

“It’s not about increasing revenues, being punitive. It’s about making sure every spaces available can be used properly.”

The foundation mentioned encroachment and “excessive fines” as to why the plan should be reworked.

“Why would a parking ticket for parking in a residential area, or having your tires on the road, be 3x the state average on Isle of Palms?” Barnett says.

Pounds says the plan is set in place for now.

“We can’t do anything without approval and oversight, and we have a really good relationship with SCDOT. If there were any changes we were looking to make, we’d certainly have to work in conjunction with them,” Pounds says.

The SCDOT and Isle of Palms City Council both say they are starting the initial review process for the Charleston Beach Foundation’s request.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Isle of Palms homeowner’s ‘sea wall’ sparks controversy over property owner rights

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) — As sea levels rise and strong storms impact coastal areas across the country, a battle is brewing on the Isle of Palms over what homeowners can do to protect their properties.One beachfront homeowner on the island, Rom Reddy, has taken matters into his own hands by building a wall that he says is protecting his property near Breach Inlet from beach erosion.This comes after Tropical Storm Idalia hit the Lowcountry coast in August 2023 and a lot of the beach behind homes on the Isle of Palms dis...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) — As sea levels rise and strong storms impact coastal areas across the country, a battle is brewing on the Isle of Palms over what homeowners can do to protect their properties.

One beachfront homeowner on the island, Rom Reddy, has taken matters into his own hands by building a wall that he says is protecting his property near Breach Inlet from beach erosion.

This comes after Tropical Storm Idalia hit the Lowcountry coast in August 2023 and a lot of the beach behind homes on the Isle of Palms disappeared.

For some homeowners, like Reddy, this meant part of their property is now regulated by the state because, under South Carolina law, the Dept. of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) division of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) oversees critical areas, which includes beaches.

“If Idalia comes in and erodes the property line, they [OCRM] have jurisdiction,” Reddy explained. “Another storm comes in — Nor’easter erodes it further — they have jurisdiction.”

So to avoid losing control of any more of his property, Reddy took action and is building a structure in front of his home aimed at protecting him from further beach erosion. However, DHEC officials said they did not find out about it until a strong storm in December exposed it.

“DHEC investigated, and has since issued the property owner and contractor cease and desist directives related to this unauthorized structure,” the agency said in a statement.

A spokesperson also explained that anything built on critical areas of the coast, like beaches, needs a permit, and erosion control structures have been banned on South Carolina beaches since 1988.

Reddy is in the process of having the structure rebuilt after the storm in December exposed it. He maintains that he is within his constitutional right to protect his property, adding that the wall is landward of the state’s jurisdictional lines known as the setback and baselines that define the beach/dune system.

“So this is a landgrab by the state,” Reddy said. “Where they are saying your property — and it’s just not this — any waterfront property — they say ‘if a storm erodes it, I own it I have jurisdiction — no plants, no bushes, no fences, nothing — I can tell you what to do with it.'”

Rob Young, a geologist and professor at Western Carolina University, said DHEC and OCRM’s regulations are ensuring that everyone’s right to use the beaches is protected.

He explained that DHEC and OCRM have regulatory authorities over the beaches, coastal waters, and the beach/dune system, identified by the setback and baselines which are redrawn every 7-10 years.

“If you are buying an oceanfront property you need to understand what the limitations are and what you can and can’t do,” he explained. “For most beachfront lots in South Carolina that active beach is probably considered or a portion may be private property — but that doesn’t mean you can do whatever you want out there.”

Young said anything an oceanfront homeowner wants to do in the critical areas needs approval.

“This isn’t just a regulation from OCRM this is the Beachfront Management Act, it is the law of South Carolina,” he said.

Young also explained that structures like sea walls are banned from South Carolina beaches because state officials have found they can often do more harm than good.

“One of the reasons we do not permit seawalls is they have impacts on adjacent property owners,” he said. “Just imagine if everybody did whatever they wanted to one lot at a time — it would look terrible and you would have property owner suing property owner.”

Young said if homeowners are concerned about beach erosion, they need to come together and discuss long-term solutions like building dunes, beach nourishment projects, and developing a plan for regular beach nourishment projects.

There is currently a beach renourishment project ongoing near Reddy’s home following the storms in August and December 2023. However, Reddy believes Isle of Palms leaders dropped the ball before then.

“They are supposed to preserve, protect, enhance and renourish these beaches,” he said. “Prior to Idalia, there was not a lick of sand nothing done to this side of the beach since 2017.”

Isle of Palms leaders dispute these claims in a statement to News 2:

“Prior to 2023, the southwest end of the beach had been stable and accretional and only required periodic post-storm emergency berm repairs. The city has monitored this shoreline annually since 2009 and the area in question became highly erosional in 2023 due to numerous storm events and abnormally high tides. As soon as the shoreline eroded to the point that the conditions met the South Carolina regulatory standards to allow emergency work, the city began restoring dunes to provide better protection against structural damage.

The city has assisted with funding major renourishment projects and emergency protective measures. Last year, IOP City Council approved spending up to $1,890,000 to protect the public beach and property through a combination of emergency sand scraping, trucking in beach-compatible sand and placement of sandbags.

The current balance of the Beach Preservation Fund is $8.3M and it grows by approximately $1.8M annually. However, the city is forecasting a total need of almost $30M for beach projects in the next five to six years to be covered between public and private funding efforts.”

City leaders added there are also plans to work with the Army Corps of Engineers on a project that would place around 500,000 cubic yards of sand along the intertidal zone between Breach Inlet and 10th Avenue. They anticipate the project to start in March 2024 and be completed in four months.

However, Reddy is not waiting around for that work to be done.

“Every property owner has the right to protect their property — and no government no one can take it away from us because that’s the supreme law of the land,” he said.

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