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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

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The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Downtown Charleston, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC

Granite Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Silestone Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Downtown Charleston?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Downtown Charleston, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Downtown Charleston, SC

No. 18 Charleston wins 20 straight, beats Northeastern 87-61

Charleston Northeastern BasketballCharleston's Pat Robinson III (15) drives against Northeastern's Jahmyl Telfort during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)BOSTON (AP) — This might not be the best time for No. 18 Charleston to be taking a week off.Sure, the Cougars could use the rest after playing four games in eight days. The players need to catch up on missed classes. And coach Pat Kelsey wouldn't mind seeing some of his recruits play &...

Charleston Northeastern Basketball

Charleston's Pat Robinson III (15) drives against Northeastern's Jahmyl Telfort during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

BOSTON (AP) — This might not be the best time for No. 18 Charleston to be taking a week off.

Sure, the Cougars could use the rest after playing four games in eight days. The players need to catch up on missed classes. And coach Pat Kelsey wouldn't mind seeing some of his recruits play — or his own kids.

But after winning 20 straight games — the longest winning streak in the nation — it might be better to just keep playing.

“I think we’re up to 20 now, but it’s always the next game,” said guard Pat Robinson III, who came off the bench Saturday to score 14 points and helped lead the Cougars to an 87-61 victory over Northeastern.

“Two or three months, we’ve got the winning streak," he said. "But it can be gone in a day — or in a few hours. So we really try to just be about the next thing, keep stacking wins on top of wins and just don’t be complacent.”

Ben Burnham scored 15 points off the bench for Charleston, which held Northeastern scoreless for more than four minutes late in the first half while turning a two-point deficit into a 36-21 edge. The Cougars (21-1, 9-0 Colonial Athletic Association) have not lost since the second game of the season, to then-No. 1 North Carolina on Nov. 11, climbing to their highest ranking in The Associated Press Top 25 since 1999.

“It’s awesome for our program. It’s awesome for our institution. It’s awesome for our city. Awesome for recruiting. But we have a really mature team that doesn’t get caught up in it," Kelsey said. “They just stay very even keel. And that’s what we’ll continue.”

Chris Doherty had 11 points and 13 rebounds and Jared Turner also scored 11 for Northeastern (8-11, 4-4). The Huskies haven’t beaten a Top 25 team since 2015.

Charleston opened an early 10-point lead before Northeastern cut it to 21-18 on Doherty’s layup with about eight minutes left in in the first half. It was 24-22 when the Cougars ran off the next 13 points – getting three baskets inside by Robinson before back-to-back 3-pointers from fellow reserves Burnham and Raekwon Horton.

Whole-genome analysis offers clarity about remains of 36 enslaved Africans in 18th-century Charleston

Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences Building on previous work from the community-initiated Anson Street African Burial Ground project, a team of researchers from Penn led a community-engaged collaborative study that confirmed that the individuals closely align genetically with populations in West and West Central Africa. The City of Charleston, South Carolina, has been on a quest to better understand the r...

Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Building on previous work from the community-initiated Anson Street African Burial Ground project, a team of researchers from Penn led a community-engaged collaborative study that confirmed that the individuals closely align genetically with populations in West and West Central Africa.

The City of Charleston, South Carolina, has been on a quest to better understand the remains of 36 people, described collectively as “the Ancestors,” since their chance discovery a decade ago in the city’s center.

In 2020, a team from the University of Pennsylvania and the nonprofit Gullah Society, whose mission was to reclaim African and African American burial sites around Charleston, made progress by sequencing the Ancestors mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). That group included Ade Ofunniyin, Joanna Gilmore, and La’Sheia Oubré from the Gullah Society, along with Theodore Schurr, a professor in Penn’s Department of Anthropology; Raquel Fleskes, then a Penn graduate student and now a University of Connecticut postdoctoral fellow; and others.

The research—a community-initiated and community-engaged study today called the Anson Street African Burial Ground (ASABG) project—showed that most of the individuals had originated in Charleston or sub-Saharan Africa and, given the burial ground’s location, had likely been enslaved. At the time, that work was the largest DNA study of its kind. It was also unique in its aim to involve the community from the start, guided by the questions and concerns of the people directly affected by what the researchers might find.

A new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paper expands on those initial results, this time getting more granular and precise. Through whole-genome sequencing, the researchers confirmed that most of the people had West African or West Central African genetic ancestry and were genetically male. Beyond that, the ASABG team verified that just one mother-child pair was related. The researchers say that, taken as a whole, these findings significantly increase what’s known about African diversity in colonial America.

“All the work we have done has been directed toward learning more about the experiences of the Ancestors and by extension the experiences of enslaved African Americans at that time,” Schurr says. “The community in Charleston has been the driving force behind this work, as its members wanted to know who the Ancestors were and what their life histories were like.”

In fact, the project grew out of feedback from the community, prompting the Gullah Society to advocate for the 2019 reinterment of the remains on the original grounds where they had been discovered and for a scientific inquiry centered around answers sought by the local African American community. Schurr and Fleskes joined the project in 2018. “Our aim has always been to do science that doesn’t objectify these remains but rather tries to restore personhood to them,” says Fleskes.

With permission from the community, she, Schurr, and the other ASABG team members started by analyzing mitochondrial DNA, the genetic material inherited from the female line alone and a frequent jumping off point for research of this type, given its abundance, size, and the fact that it’s often well-preserved. That examination revealed broad strokes about the individuals’ background and demography but couldn’t go as deep as whole-genome sequencing would. Archival maps and subsequent bone analysis led the researchers to conclude that the remains belonged to enslaved people.

“Those findings generated a great deal of interest from the community, which encouraged us to continue this work,” Schurr says.

As a next step, the team conducted a more extensive analysis, using data from 18 low-coverage genomes. “With ancient DNA research, the DNA you’re able to extract isn’t in the same form as for a living person. It’s broken up, fragmented,” Schurr says. “We want high coverage, which means 10, 20, 50 copies of the complete genome. In this case, the amount we had was small, so we call that low coverage, yet it was still adequate to complete these kinds of analyses.”

In conjunction with material from the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, these data provided greater clarity on the Ancestors’ genetic history. Specifically, the researchers found that nine had DNA that aligned closely with populations from Gabon in West Central Africa, and nine had DNA that lined up with reference populations in Ghana, the Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, and the Gambia. In addition, of 27 individuals for which the researchers could analyze genetic sex, 21 were chromosomal males.

To verify what the researchers had determined with their initial mitochondrial DNA analysis, they also looked at 31 uniparental haplotypes, including both mtDNA and Y chromosomes, that are passed down from just one parent each generation, according to Schurr. “They represent a unique part of the genome inherited in a singular kind of way,” he says. From these data, they confirmed the connection between one mother-child pair and strengthened their hypothesis about the remains’ genetic origins; of 27 individuals analyzed, 24 displayed genetic characteristics also found in contemporary African and African American populations.

“We’ve also been able to confirm that at least one of those individuals has a genetic signature that shows mixing with a person of Native descent,” says Schurr. “That’s interesting because the first people enslaved in Charleston were Native Americans. Shortly thereafter, African people were brought to colonial America as forced labor.”

The findings, which align with what the researchers expected they might see, have been shared widely. The team filmed its scientific process in the lab, reported back to the community every few months and held a webinar series to share results. “We wanted to make sure the community members were the first people we talked to,” Fleskes says. “This project is about relationship building, trust building, being transparent in all steps of the research process, and being accountable.”

Schurr says this research can make visible a history that was either previously unknown or has historically been overlooked. For that reason, he and colleagues are creating material about the Ancestors and other aspects of Charleston’s past that they hope the city’s STEM curriculum might eventually incorporate. Schurr says he also thinks the findings have already influenced Charleston to start taking responsibility for its history, through actions like the reinternment of the Ancestors.

“We want to bring views forward that have largely been ignored,” Schurr says, “to help acknowledge that this is not something separate from American history but a part of it.”

Funding for this work came from the National Geographic Society (grants NGS-52378R-18 and NGS-54324E-18); the University Research Foundation of the University of Pennsylvania; the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Department of Anthropology; the City of Charleston; the Gullah Society Inc.; a Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania; and a National Science Foundation SBE Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (Grant SPRF-FR 2105384).

Theodore Schurr is a professor in the Department of Anthropology in the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also a consulting curator in the Physical Anthropology and American sections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology at Penn.

Raquel Fleskes is a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Connecticut. She earned her Ph.D. from Penn in 2021.

Other co-authors on the paper include Graciela S. Cabana of the University of Tennessee; Ade A. Ofunniyin and Joanna K. Gilmore of the Anson Street African Burial Ground Project and the College of Charleston; Chelsey Juarez of California State University, Fresno; Emilee Karcher of the University of California, Davis; and Grant Mishoe and La’Sheia Oubré of the Anson Street African Burial Ground Project.

North Charleston wants public feedback during its redistricting process

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the City of North Charleston grows and leaders work to rebalance the city’s districts, they want the public to get involved.The city is holding a public meeting Tuesday and city leaders are encouraging residents to come look over the plan and share their thoughts or concerns. Redistricting is meant to make sure that each vote is counted equally throughout the city.The population of North Charleston jumped more than 20% from around 97,000 in 2010 to around 117,000 in 2020, ...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the City of North Charleston grows and leaders work to rebalance the city’s districts, they want the public to get involved.

The city is holding a public meeting Tuesday and city leaders are encouraging residents to come look over the plan and share their thoughts or concerns. Redistricting is meant to make sure that each vote is counted equally throughout the city.

The population of North Charleston jumped more than 20% from around 97,000 in 2010 to around 117,000 in 2020, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Ryan Johnson, the Public Information Officer for North Charleston, said every district will be affected.

Johnson said specifically, there has been a lot of growth along Dorchester Road, and he said expects the districts that fall within Dorchester County to be drawn smaller to account for population changes.

He said community input in this process is essential because these districts will determine the council member’s areas that will represent the public.

Click here to view the proposed maps and other data and reports from the City of North Charleston.

Tuesday’s public meeting starts at 5 p.m. and will be held on the third floor of North Charleston’s City Hall, located at 2500 City Hall Lane. The meeting can be viewed online here.

Johnson said residents who are unable to attend today’s meeting can submit comments online, or email written comments to fieldsc@northcharleston.org. The maps will also be on display at the Gethsemani Community Center, the Perry-Webb Community Center, the North Charleston Athletic Center and the north Charleston Aquatic Center for the next two weeks.

“We just want to encourage people to look at the new maps, look at the data, and all that’s been involved in that, and give us your opinion and your feedback,” Johnson said.

He said the city may make changes to the proposed draft after receiving public input.

From there, the map will go through the typical ordinance process, requiring a couple of city council readings before being officially adopted.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston Wine Festivals Hosting Brunch Fest – March 18, 2023

After a hiatus due to the pandemic, Charleston Wine Festivals is excited to again be hosting their annual Charleston Brunch Festival on Saturday, March 18 from 12-4 p.m. at Johnson Hagood Stadium at The Citadel (68 Hagood Ave., Charleston, SC 29403).This 21+ event will feature brunch bites from Charleston’s favorite restaurants and food trucks like Dashi and Wicked Waffles, mimosas, bloody marys, brunch punch, beer, wine, a silent ...

After a hiatus due to the pandemic, Charleston Wine Festivals is excited to again be hosting their annual Charleston Brunch Festival on Saturday, March 18 from 12-4 p.m. at Johnson Hagood Stadium at The Citadel (68 Hagood Ave., Charleston, SC 29403).

This 21+ event will feature brunch bites from Charleston’s favorite restaurants and food trucks like Dashi and Wicked Waffles, mimosas, bloody marys, brunch punch, beer, wine, a silent disco tent, a DJ and live music by Davis & The Love.

General admission tickets (includes all drinks from 12 p.m.- 3:45 p.m., food not included) are on sale now for $45 and will increase to $50 after March 9.

Tickets purchased day of (if available) will be $60. The first 500 tickets sold online will be $35.

Early-entry tickets which allow festival goers to enter at 11 a.m. and include all drinks until 3:45 p.m. plus three food tickets to be used at any food tent are now available for $65 and will increase to $70 after March 12 ($80 day of; food tickets must be used between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.).

The first 500 tickets sold online will be $55.

Brunch samples will be available for $4 each, paid directly to each food vendor.

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Super Bowl Sunday is just around the corner and here is a roundup of lively sports bars and restaurants that are perfect places to cheer on the NFL’s top teams as they go head-to-head, watch Rihanna take on the halftime show and enjoy the night with your whole crew.

These bars and restaurants have a variety of Super Bowl food and drink specials to celebrate one of the biggest sporting events of the year.

Come enjoy the big game over a variety of food buffets, specialty snacks, call drinks and lots of Super Bowl fun.

Benchmark

Benchmark – 2450 N. Clark St. (Lincoln Park)

A lively sports bar in the heart of Old Town with over 40 TV’s and a menu of shareable snacks, burgers, pizza, beer and signature cocktails – making Benchmark the perfect place to celebrate Super Bowl Sunday!

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. For each $40 food & drink package, guests watch the big game and have access to:

Book tickets and reservations for Benchmark here.

Kirkwood

Kirkwood – 2934 N Sheffield Ave. (Lakeview)

A neighborhood sparts bar in Lakeview with great food, drinks and a spacious beer garden that is perfect to take on the big Super Bowl game.

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. Kirkwood guests have access to:

Book tickets and reservations for Kirkwood here.

Gaslight

Gaslight – 2450 N. Clark St. (Lincoln Park)

A lively neighborhood bar in Lincoln Park with three full bars, a delicious menu and a spacious year-round patio that is open seven days a week for brunch, lunch and dinner. A place for the whole squad to watch the Super Bowl & Halftime Show!

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. For each $30 food & drink package, guests can cheer on their favorite team and have access to:

Book tables and reservations for Gaslight here.

Ranalli’s Lincoln Park

Ranalli’s Lincoln Park – 1925 N Lincoln Ave. (Lincoln Park)

Ranalli’s Lincoln Park offers guests delicious pizzas, iconic apps, and great drinks in a comfortable and communal setting. Guests can enjoy a variety of specialty pizzas, signature 4C appetizers, hearty and sandwiches, along with craft beer and classic cocktails, making it a perfect spot to watch the Super Bowl!

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. Ranalli’s Lincoln Park is offering a variety of food and drink specials for every sports fan:

Book tables and reservations for Ranalli’s Lincoln Park here.

Ranalli

Ranalli’s West Loop – 1326 W Madison St. (West Loop):

As a longstanding neighborhood pizza bar, Ranalli’s West Loop offers guests delicious pizzas, iconic apps, and great drinks in a comfortable and communal setting. Guests can enjoy a variety of specialty pizzas, signature 4C appetizers, hearty sandwiches, and fresh salads along with craft beer and classic cocktails, making it a perfect place to celebrate Super Bowl Sunday with your squad!

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. Ranalli’s West Loop Super Bowl Sunday specials include:

Book tables and reservations for Ranalli’s West Loop here.

Highline

Highline 169 W. Kinzie St. (River North)

A staple for lunch, happy hour and dinner throughout the week, Highline offers upscale bar fare and a FREE arcade with classic games perfect for anyone looking for a fun Super Bowl Sunday.

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. For each $30 food and drink package, guests can have access to:

Book tables and reservations for Highline here.

80 Proof

80 Proof 1500 N. Wells St. (Old Town)

Located in Old Town, 80 Proof provides a unique dining-to-nightlife experience with three full bars and an approachable menu of vegan bar bites and 4C classics. Come celebrate Super Bowl Sunday at this iconic destination!

Sunday, February 12 starting at 5 p.m. until the end of the game. For each $40 Call Drink & Food Package guests can have:

Book tables and reservations for 80 Proof here.

Brickhouse

Brickhouse 3647 N. Clark St. (Wrigleyville):

Located next door to the historic Wrigley Field, Brickhouse offers an elevated dining experience with four expansive bars, two outdoor terraces and stunning views. Celebrate Super Bowl Sunday at Brickhouse!

Sunday, February 12 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Brickhouse is hosting a Big Game Tailgate! For each $25 ticket, guests can have access to:

Book your Brickhouse reservation here.

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