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Real Deal Countertops | 818 Central Ave Unit A, Summerville, SC 29483

866-707-1414 843-832-0819 sales1@realdealcountertops.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30AM - 5:00PM Sat: 8:30AM to 1PM

The best countertops make a statement in your home that other features cannot. You've worked hard to incorporate unique designs and flavors throughout your home, so why should your countertops be any different?

At Real Deal Countertops, we aspire to combine the beauty and durability of natural stone with unrivaled, personalized attention to all customers. With the highest quality materials and the most helpful customer service, we give our clients the opportunity to make informed decisions that they feel good about for years. Our story in the countertop fabrication and manufacturing industry began more than 19 years ago, when Rafael Quedevez started out as a sales representative in Massachusetts. Working his way up through the ranks, Rafael soon made his way to South Carolina to open and manage his own companies. In 2013, we created real Deal Countertops. Since that time, we are proud to have served more than 5,000 customers in South Carolina and beyond.

Our leadership team combines more than 40 years of experience in the home remodeling service industry. Always striving to create a better product for our customers, we use the latest in robotics technologies and the sharpest minds in the business to craft countertops of unparalleled quality. Unlike other countertop companies in Downtown Charleston, SC, we only source the finest stone slabs in the world.

At Real Deal Countertops, we offer a wide range of styles and materials to choose from, including:

Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartzite

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC

Caesarstone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Silestone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Marble

 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Sensa

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Pollar White

 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Vicostone

 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartz

We are committed to ensuring that granite, marble, and other unique, exotic stones are attainable to all who desire them. If you're in search of a trustworthy counter company with a team of knowledgeable, helpful experts, you have come to the right place!

Most Popular Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Choosing the best countertops for your kitchen is an important decision, but it doesn't have to be a hard one. One of the best ways to narrow down your search is to find out what kind of countertop material you'd like to use. While it's true that material and style trends change over time, there are several counters that have always been top sellers.

Some of the most popular countertops we sell include:

Marble Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

There's no way around it - marble adds jaw-dropping beauty to just about any room and is known for its good looks. It is a dense stone that comes in many different hues like greens, browns, pinks, greys, whites, and more. While marble countertops often have otherworldly beauty, they can be susceptible to stains and cracks. Marble is also considered one of the most expensive counters to choose from, though the truth is marble comes in a wide range of qualities and prices.

  • Pros: Stunning beauty, plenty of beautiful choices.
  • Cons: Not always used in kitchens due to chance of staining.
  • Popular Colors: Portinari, Shadow Storm, Super White, Lumen, Calacatta Linconni, Nobulato Honned, Shadow, Grey Imperiale Honed.
Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC
 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC

Granite Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

When it comes to popularity, granite countertops take the cake. Granite countertops usually contain a blend of quartz, feldspar, mica, and other minerals. Granite can add an edge of elegance and even a country-chic feel to your kitchen, making it a well-rounded stone. Granite is durable and scratch-resistant, though it can require sealing and DIY chip repair.

  • Pros: Luxurious, rich look featuring natural stone that is durable, heat resistant, and scratch-resistant.
  • Cons: Hard material that may require DIY chip repair and sealing.
  • Popular Colors: Blue Jeans, Creama Pearl, Alure, Galaxy White, Luna Pear, Steel Grey, Ubatuba, Oro Brazil.

Quartz Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Quartz is a manufactured material that represents one of our favorite four-letter words: easy! If you're looking to add a high-end feel to your kitchen or bathroom, quartz is an excellent material to consider. Like granite, quartz countertops can add a decadent vibe to any room. Unlike granite, you may not have to seal quartz quite as often (if ever).

  • Pros: Quartz countertops come in plenty of colors to choose from and are easy to clean. They are also strong, scratch-resistant, and don't require sealing.
  • Cons: Quartz is not as heat resistant as other materials like granite counters. Sharp corners tend to crack, but that can be remedied with rounded corners.
  • Popular Colors: Noble Grey, Raw Concrete, Frosty Carrina, Shitake, Pebble, Pietra Grey, Sierra Madre, Arctic.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartz Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Silestone Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

A manufactured material made from quartz crystals, Silestone countertops are equal parts gorgeous and practical. Known for being a durable, non-porous choice, Silestone is resistant to stains, scratches, and even some forms of bacteria. Homeowners who choose Silestone do so because they can get a high-end look without having to worry too much about maintenance. Silestone counters look great in many different homes, from contemporary abodes with modern accents to vintage-looking kitchens.

  • Pros: Silestone countertops are non-porous, meaning germs and bacteria can't lodge themselves inside this material. This makes Silestone counters great for kitchens and bathrooms alike. This material also comes in a wide variety of colors and resists scratches and chips. Overall, Silestone is an excellent choice if you want to make a solid long-term investment without much upkeep.
  • Cons: While Silestone is great if you're looking for a low-maintenance counter option, it can be sensitive to harsh chemicals like bleach and ammonia. Silestone is also not recommended for outdoor use since the resins used to make the material do not do well with UV light.
  • Popular Colors: Daria, Gray Expo, Lagoon, Calacatta Gold, Arctic, Blanco City, Gris Expo, Desert Silver

Quartzite Countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC

Not to be confused with quartz countertops, which are manmade, quartzite is a naturally occurring stone that is quarried much in the same way that granite is. If you're a fan of marble counters, quartzite mimics its looks without as much upkeep. Like granite, it is a very durable choice and adds an upscale feeling to almost any room you choose.

  • Pros: Since it doesn't require any special cleaners, quartzite looks great without much maintenance. When it gets dirty, soap and water should be all you need to clean. Quartzite is also a great long-term option since it doesn't wear down quickly at all.
  • Cons: Heat is required to form quartzite. However, you should avoid putting hot pots and pans on your quartzite countertops. Because quartzite comes in many different varieties, some forms of quartzite need to be sealed more often than others.
  • Popular Colors: Maya, Fusion, Locomotion, Callacata, Airy Concrete, Cocada White
 Kitchen Remodeling With Laminate Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Which Countertop is Right for You?

If you're just beginning your search for new countertops, it can be a little overwhelming trying to whittle down your options. We've got good news - with over 19 years in the industry, our team of experts has learned a thing or two about countertops. When you come to the Real Deal Countertops showroom, one of our goals is to educate you about our products and your countertop options, so you can make an educated purchasing decision.

 Kitchen Remodeling With Marble Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

How Will You Use Your Countertops in Downtown Charleston?

The first and perhaps most crucial part of your countertop choice should stem from how you and your family use your countertops. For example, if you have kids, your counters will probably see a lot of activity. Between standard eating times and "in-between" meals that teens are known for, your counters might double as food prep stations. As such, you might need a countertop material that is resistant to most food and beverage stains. If you own a rental property that sees a lot of foot traffic from strangers, you might want to consider an economical material that is also durable.

  • Do you cook a lot?
  • Do you host a lot of parties?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
  • How long will you be living in your home?
Once you figure out exactly how you'll be using your countertops, you can begin to narrow down your choices.
 Kitchen Remodeling With Quartzite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

How Much Upkeep Is Too Much?

Be realistic and honest with yourself about this question. Before you fall in love with how a countertop material looks, be sure you understand how much upkeep is needed. Some materials require more care, while others don't need much at all.

Keep these points in mind:
  • Materials like quartz only need to be wiped down occasionally.
  • Materials like granite, marble, and limestone will need to be sealed at least once a year.
  • Some materials may be durable but aren't stain resistant.

The bottom line is this: Assess the maintenance demands that come along with the materials you're looking at. Marble countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC are elegant, but if you'e unwilling to keep them looking their best, why bother buying the material?

You should be aware that most countertop materials will require some form of upkeep, even if it' minimal. To help keep your counters in pristine condition, consider these care and precaution tips:

  • Many common foods contain acids that will dull or even damage the surface of stone countertops.Use coasters to protect your counters, especially if you'e drinking something with citrus juices or alcohol.
  • Do not place scalding hot pots or pans directly on your countertops.
  • Use mats or trivets to place under hot dishes.
  • If you spill liquid on your countertops, blot the spill with a paper towel ASAP. Wiping the spill will cause it to spread.
  • Use mild soap and plain water to clean up stains.

Which Colors and Materials Match Your Home's Aesthetics?

For many homeowners, this question is almost always top-of-mind. After all, you want to choose colors and materials that fit well with other features in your home. When selecting your countertop materials, try to choose a tone that contrasts with your other amenities, like your cabinets. Don't go for a perfect match. As an example, black granite is a beautiful contrast to white cabinets.

Consider these questions when choosing your countertop materials:
  • Are there one or two colors that you love more than others?
  • Does your choice go well with the color of your kitchen's walls?
  • Do you want to switch up your kitchen's style or keep it the same?
  • Will you be painting your kitchen a different color in the future?
  • Will you be replacing your appliances soon?
 Kitchen Remodeling With Stone Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC
Kitchen Countertop Installation Downtown Charleston, SC

Real Deal Countertops Pro Tip:

Because your home's accessories and paint job may change with time, your countertops should have a versatile color. That way, you won't have problems matching them with new paint colors or appliances.

 Custom Countertops For Kitchen Remodeling Downtown Charleston, SC  Kitchen Remodeling With Granite Countertops Downtown Charleston, SC

Countertop Remodeling Done Right

At Real Deal Countertops, our #1 priority is your satisfaction. Unlike some countertop companies in Downtown Charleston, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We strive for excellence with every transaction we complete and pledge to faithfully implement innovative techniques to ensure that our products remain affordable. With the help of Real Deal Countertops, remodeling your kitchen and bath will be painless and easy.

The appearance of a kitchen or bath depends on the right countertop selection, proper fabrication, and expert installation. Are you interested in granite countertops in Downtown Charleston, SC? Maybe quartzite is a better choice for your family. Whatever you choose, know that our skilled installers and fabricators will make a template so that all custom pieces fit perfectly in your home.

What Clients Say About Us

Ready to get started? Have questions about our inventory?

We're here to help answer all your questions. Please feel free to give our office a call today at 866-707-1414 Before you know it, you will be ready for your new set of Real Deal Countertops!

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Latest News in Downtown Charleston, SC

Planes divert to Charleston after military jet incident at Savannah airport

An incident that shut down the runway at Savannah/Hilton Head International on May 6 caused several commercial flights to be diverted up the coast to Charleston.An F-22 Raptor fighter jet participating in an exercise called "Sentry Savannah" was involved in an "aircraft mishap" at about 11:30 a.m. Monday, according to the Air National Guard 165th Airlift Wing.The runway was closed temporarily, forcing three flights to be redirected to Charleston International, where officials said the planes taxied until the...

An incident that shut down the runway at Savannah/Hilton Head International on May 6 caused several commercial flights to be diverted up the coast to Charleston.

An F-22 Raptor fighter jet participating in an exercise called "Sentry Savannah" was involved in an "aircraft mishap" at about 11:30 a.m. Monday, according to the Air National Guard 165th Airlift Wing.

The runway was closed temporarily, forcing three flights to be redirected to Charleston International, where officials said the planes taxied until they were cleared to return to the Savannah airport.

None of the aircraft deplaned while at CHS or affected other flights.

The F-22 incident remains under investigation. The pilot was not injured, the Air National Guard said in a statement.

Editor's note: The story has been updated to replace an erroneous photograph.

Kion North America said May 7 that it is partnering with Fox Robotics to make FoxBot-branded autonomous loaders that use onboard cameras and special laser sensors that can measure distances and avoid obstructions to navigate loading docks and warehouses.

The material-handling devices can detect a range of pallet types and move loads up to 3,000 pounds to and from programmed locations.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

“Our traction in the marketplace is tremendous, and Fox Robotics is at an inflection point in its growth arc,” the Austin, Texas-based company’s CEO said in a written statement. “We are experiencing unprecedented demand and have a massive list of bookings for Fox Robotics products and solutions. The partnership with Kion will most certainly pave the way to capture all this commercial growth.”

Fox Robotics said the FoxBot, introduced commercially in 2019, can improve workplace safety and increase productivity.

Retail giant Walmart said last month that it will try out 19 of the machines at four distribution centers, according to a report by Grocery Dive. The retail giant’s import distribution center in Ridgeville is not among the test sites, which are in Florida, Texas, New York and Alabama.

Walmart, which owns a minority investment stake in Fox Robotics, has said in investors meetings that it intends to increase the use of AI and automation technologies at all of its distribution sites in coming years.

BMW, which builds sport-utility vehicles in Greer, has also invested in the company through its iVentures venture capital firm.

“The logistics space is the single biggest market for automation for the next ten years,” Till Reuter, director of Fox Robotics’ board, said in a written statement. “Converting the shipping and receiving dock, the gateway to the warehouse, from a manual operation to an automated one will drive the greatest growth and change.”

Mount Pleasant council members discuss the future of cruise ships

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Mount Pleasant Town Council members met Monday to discuss the future of potential cruise ships being able to dock and disembark at Patriots Point.This has become a controversial topic for the community and town council after the South Carolina Ports Authority decided to end a homeport cruising contract with Carnival Cruises to instead focus on the redevelopment of Union Pi...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Mount Pleasant Town Council members met Monday to discuss the future of potential cruise ships being able to dock and disembark at Patriots Point.

This has become a controversial topic for the community and town council after the South Carolina Ports Authority decided to end a homeport cruising contract with Carnival Cruises to instead focus on the redevelopment of Union Pier. Community members spoke during the public comment session and said that they wanted cruise ships in Mount Pleasant because of the economic impact.

Benjamin Flowers Jr, the Vice President of the International Longshoreman Association Local 1422 in Charleston, said he was concerned about the number of jobs people would lose if the town didn’t allow for cruise ships to come to Mount Pleasant.

“We’re here because we’re concerned, number one, and I’ll be honest with you, we’re concerned about over 500 to 800 jobs per week that we might lose if Carnival leaves the Port of Charleston,” Flowers says. “The cruise, it really affects us because it’s a lot of job loss, it’s a lot of tax base that’s going to be lost from the community.”

He added that it’s important to keep being a part of the tourist industry and supporting the jobs for the community.

“We don’t want to see their jobs go away either, but as I mentioned, because of state law and availability of land and lack of infrastructure, those cruise ship-related jobs aren’t going to be able to come to Mount Pleasant,” Mayor Will Haynie says.

At the meeting, a representative from Patriot’s Point said there is no available land that they could use for cruise ships.

“This is the first time in my nine years as an elected official in Mount Pleasant that I have seen people advocating for something on someone else’s land. If the state ports authority or the Patriot’s Point development authority wanted cruise ships there, they would be in here talking about it,” Haynie says.

It was also discussed that there is a state law for Patriots Point that prohibits the use of anything related to passengers or cargo of ocean-going vessels. Haynie says that they have tour boats and water taxis there, but that those are not ocean-going vessels that take passengers away from Charleston.

Others who spoke during the public comment session expressed concerns about the increase in traffic. However, Jazzie Clay, a Charleston native and member of the ILA, doesn’t think that would be an issue.

“As far as the traffic, the traffic is going to be thick regardless of where, or what is in Charleston. They’re building everywhere, so what is the difference of building a hotel, an apartment complex, or relocating the cruise ships to Mount Pleasant?” Clay says.

Clay says she wouldn’t be opposed to the cruise ships being relocated to any other spots in the Charleston area, but she didn’t understand what the problem was for Mount Pleasant.

Town Council Member Guang Ming Whitley was not in favor of the cruise ships coming to Mount Pleasant and asked why Mount Pleasant should want to take this on.

“For me, the question is why did Charleston stop doing it?” Whitley says. “They didn’t want the cruise lines disembarking and embarking from Charleston, and that’s the primary issue here, is them thrusting upon our town and then we’re trying to be forced to take on what Charleston didn’t want.”

Haynie says that this discussion has not gone away and that they are trying to put it to rest and get the pressure off Patriots Point.

He says now they are waiting to hear back from the South Carolina Ports Authority as they requested for them to lay out their plans on the future of cruise ships.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Port of Charleston's $105M paper mill deal has a long time horizon

It requires time, patience and purpose.The S.C. State Ports Authority's $105 million acquisition of the former WestRock paper mill along the Cooper River in North Charleston is a textbook example. A decade or more will likely pass before the 280-acre waterfront property will begin its next life as a sizable shipping terminal."It's going to take a lot of preparation before that site could ever be utilized," SPA chief executive Barbara Melvin told lawmakers at a hearing in Columbia last week.The sale of the mill ...

It requires time, patience and purpose.

The S.C. State Ports Authority's $105 million acquisition of the former WestRock paper mill along the Cooper River in North Charleston is a textbook example. A decade or more will likely pass before the 280-acre waterfront property will begin its next life as a sizable shipping terminal.

"It's going to take a lot of preparation before that site could ever be utilized," SPA chief executive Barbara Melvin told lawmakers at a hearing in Columbia last week.

The sale of the mill with its 5,000 feet of future berth space along the Cooper River was finalized April 26, according to real estate documents recorded last week with the Charleston County Register of Deeds.

As part of the deal, WestRock Co. included a swath of undeveloped land off Jedburg Road near Summerville.

The Atlanta-based packaging company and successor to the old Westvaco Corp. announced a year ago it would shut down the 500-worker papermaking plant by late summer after 86 years, citing a "combination of high operating costs and the need for significant capital investment."

WestRock also stated that it was preparing the property for sale.

The SPA was an eager buyer for an obvious reason. The manufacturing site off Virginia Avenue near I-526 will enable it to more than double the size of its North Charleston Terminal right next door.

"It's very exciting for us when we're able to integrate that property into an existing facility," Melvin said.

Just not anytime soon.

The conversion from paper mill to port isn't projected to be needed or completed until the 2030s or possibly the 2040s, Melvin projected.

The acquisition is one piece in a complicated and expensive transportation puzzle that requires several other big-ticket projects to fall into place. All are tied to the emergence of supersized container vessels that the SPA and many other port operators are scrambling to accommodate to stay competitive.

Among the first items on the to-do list is the completion of the SPA's 3-year-old deepwater Leatherman Terminal a few miles away on the former Navy base.

Another is the proposed replacement of the nearby Don Holt Bridge with a higher span that will allow the mega-vessels to safely pass under I-526.

Also, the navigation channel in that section of the Cooper will need to be deepened by several feet.

For those reasons, Melvin said, the WestRock property “is not the next increment of capacity for us."

"We will build out the Leatherman Terminal before we move to that area because to utilize fully the paper mill site, along with any kind of modernization to our North Charleston facility …. we need to be able to handle the biggest ships there," she said.

Melvin and her predecessors at the SPA have stressed that planning how and where the port adds new berths and wharf space is a multigenerational process. it often requires early upfront investments and involves lengthy time horizons that can stretch decades into the future.

“Just permitting, financing, planning … all of that takes a lot of time," she said.

While the WestRock closure was regrettable based on the job losses, it also was a fortuitous once-in-a-lifetime chance for the port to secure and recycle an environmentally challenging site that will provide enough expansion space until at least mid-century, based on current projections.

“This is the future," Melvin told lawmakers, who are expected to provide $55 million in state funds to close the deal. "Port activity really takes 20, 30, 40 years sometimes to plan. And if we had not grabbed this opportunity with the WestRock property, in 20 years, whoever is sitting in this seat should have to answer the question, 'Who was asleep at the switch?' And that would have been me.”

The North Charleston Terminal is now the smallest of the SPA's three box-ship hubs, with five cranes that can move up to 500,000 containers annually.

Once the mill property is added to the mix, it'll be able to handle 10 times as much cargo, making it, by far, the largest.

Promote literacy, not book bans; College of Charleston shoehorned into neighborhoods | Letters

I appreciate that South Carolina citizens care about the welfare of students, but I don’t understand how the war on books will protect students from the challenges they face.Some of the same people who fear that school libraries contain an arsenal of forbidden narratives also complain that students aren’t reading.I agree that we need to promote literacy, but why is there so much conflict about what children are reading if they supposedly aren’t reading?South Carolina is not known for having stellar publ...

I appreciate that South Carolina citizens care about the welfare of students, but I don’t understand how the war on books will protect students from the challenges they face.

Some of the same people who fear that school libraries contain an arsenal of forbidden narratives also complain that students aren’t reading.

I agree that we need to promote literacy, but why is there so much conflict about what children are reading if they supposedly aren’t reading?

South Carolina is not known for having stellar public education, but I suspect the state’s high poverty rate is more responsible for academic and mental health issues than literary classics and contemporary literature.

I have read some of the books that have been banned in Spartanburg County School District 1, and I am much more disturbed about the conversations I have had with disabled residents, pregnant women and children who are experiencing homelessness.

Some media are baptized with stories about gun violence, but I doubt children are having nightmares because of “Nineteen Minutes,” a novel that follows the unfolding of a school shooting.

Most students have seen videos of the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, yet more people fear young minds are being traumatized by “Slaughterhouse-Five,” Kurt Vonnegut’s novel about a character dealing with his post-war psychological trauma.

It would be wonderful if transforming our community could be achieved by casting out stories that are a reflection of a world that children experience.

One way to make our community a better place is to ensure all citizens have the freedom to read.

The ability to share ideas, knowledge and stories is the cornerstone of our republic.

META GRIFFIN

Spartanburg

On the subject of the now-closed Wentworth Street parking garage, I bought my house on Montagu Street in 1971 and lived there happily for 34 years.

Like David and Scottie Hoffman's and Jack Handegan’s families, I count myself proud to have been among the first wave of pioneering settlers to have recognized Harleston Village for the jewel it was and to make it my home.

What is being confronted at this juncture is, at a basic bottom line, a continuation of the massive historic failure of successive municipal and college administrations to acknowledge that the inner peninsula and Harleston Village, in particular, are places to be valued and respected.

The College of Charleston and its thousands of students should never have been shoehorned into such a tight geographic area with finite parking options.

The college should have been required decades ago to locate as many programs as possible off of the peninsula and to develop required satellite parking with a shuttle system for students.

Instead, students assume the right to have their own car and to jam the city’s streets to the detriment of adjacent neighborhoods.

This is a massive failure.

Given the solid degree of proactivity evidenced thus far in dealing with such thorny concerns, I am hopeful that the Cogswell administration will step in to problem-solve around this critical issue where previous administrations have failed to do so.

TERRY C. FOX

Johns Island

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6 concerts to see at North Charleston Performing Arts Center and Coliseum in 2024

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) — The remainder of 2024 at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center and Coliseum is filled with major headliners visiting to perform, from Rock legends like Heart to up-and-coming country music artists like Jelly Roll.Here’s a breakdown of some top acts from every genre to see.GRETA VAN FLEETMay 12, North Charleston Coliseum, 7 p.m.The singers of “Safari Song,” Black Smoke Rising,” and “Light My Love” will take the stage th...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) — The remainder of 2024 at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center and Coliseum is filled with major headliners visiting to perform, from Rock legends like Heart to up-and-coming country music artists like Jelly Roll.

Here’s a breakdown of some top acts from every genre to see.

GRETA VAN FLEET

May 12, North Charleston Coliseum, 7 p.m.

The singers of “Safari Song,” Black Smoke Rising,” and “Light My Love” will take the stage this Sunday at the North Charleston Coliseum on their Starcatcher World Tour, with tours opening at 6 p.m. Parking for the event is $10, and tickets are still available. If you can’t attend this one, the band will play in Duluth, GA, next. Make sure to check out the Coliseum’s clear bag policy before you head to the show.

FLASHBACK FUNK FEST

May 26, North Charleston PAC, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring performances from Morris Day and The Time, Confunkshun, Midnight Start, and Brick, if you’re into R&B, funk, and soul, you’ve found the show for it. Grab your tickets and dress in your funkiest clothes for a night of throwback fun. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and parking will be $10.

STEVE MILLER BAND

June 13, North Charleston Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m.

The legend that is Steve Haworth Miller will grace the stage at 7:30 p.m., with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. Known for numerous hit recordings like “Take the Money and Run,” “The Joker,” “Jet Airliner,” “Space Cowboy,” and more, grab your tickets fast before you miss the chance to hear them live.

JELLY ROLL

September 19, North Charleston Coliseum, 7 p.m.

This up-and-coming country rap artist is headlining the coliseum stage at 7 p.m. with opening acts Warren Zeiders and Alexandra Kay on The Beautifully Broken Tour. This a Live Nation concert, so grab tickets during concert week, May 8 through 14, for a discounted price of 25 dollars.

HEART

October 17, North Charleston Coliseum, 8 p.m.

Rock icons Heart, known for classics like “Magic Man,” “Crazy On You,” “Dreamboat Annie,” “Barracuda,” and so many more, will take the stage at the North Charleston Coliseum at 8 p.m. Special guest Cheap Trick will also perform. Don’t miss seeing sisters and Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Ann and Nancy Wilson live. Tickets are on sale now.

MERCY ME

October 20, North Charleston Coliseum, 7 p.m.

This contemporary Christian band will play alongside other Christian bands, Crowder and Cochren, and Co. Mercy Me is known for songs like “Then Christ Came,” “To Not Worship You,” and “Dear Younger Me.” The band can be frequently heard on the popular Christian music radio channel K-Love. To get tickets, go to Ticketmaster.

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